A Top 25 Business & Marketing Podcast
Creating the Next Normal - Ryan and Robbie talk new Marketing Opportunities in the Pandemic

April 17, 2020

Creating the Next Normal - Ryan and Robbie talk new Marketing Opportunities in the Pandemic
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In this episode, Ryan and Robbie discuss key opportunities for businesses that are willing to be bold during the pandemic. From tactical ideas to observations for how the market will change forever, this is a jam-packed episode of marketing value.
Key Takeaways:
- There is no "getting back to normal", brands must create their new normal
- Find your brands new recipe for success knowing things are going to be different
- Content and customer engagement are huge opportunities
- Strike while it's hot, Amazon's core differentiators are down for the short term
Please share, review, and subscribe!
The Radical Marketing Podcast is always looking for intriguing guests. Email inquiries to info@radical.company
Follow us:
@radical_results on Instagram
@ryanalford on Instagram
www.radical.company
Sponsorships: off for this episode


In this episode, Ryan and Robbie discuss key opportunities for businesses that are willing to be bold during the pandemic. From tactical ideas to observations for how the market will change forever, this is a jam-packed episode of marketing value.

Key Takeaways:

- There is no "getting back to normal", brands must create their new normal

- Find your brands new recipe for success knowing things are going to be different

- Content and customer engagement are huge opportunities

- Strike while it's hot, Amazon's core differentiators are down for the short term

Please share, review, and subscribe!

The Radical Marketing Podcast is always looking for intriguing guests. Email inquiries to info@radical.company

Follow us:

@radical_results on Instagram

@ryanalford on Instagram

www.radical.company

Sponsorships: off for this episode

Transcript

Ryan Alford (Recorded) [00:00:01] Hey, guys, the podcast episode is coming shortly. Just wanted to do a quick note about Gvl Hustle. Gvl Hustle is the community that Tyler Harrison founded about three years ago. We've been doing meetings, training and a way to get like-minded business and networking opportunities here in the state of South Carolina, where we're from and where my agency Radical exists now. And I just wanted to do a quick plug for Gvl Hustle.com. If you visit the website, we've got a ton of great merchandise for sale and a hundred percent of the proceeds from those purchases are going to impact the United Way of Greenville's Covid-19 Fund on GvlHustle.com. We'd really appreciate the support and some really cool merchandise he's been developing.

Ryan Alford [00:00:56] Hey, guys, welcome to the latest edition of the Radical Marketing Podcast, joined by my partner in crime on many of these episodes, Robbie Fitzwater. Good to be officially social-distancing. 

Robbie Fitzwater [00:01:11] It's good to see you again through a computer this time. But we're keeping it safe and healthy. 

Ryan Alford [00:01:54] So people around the globe are now doing more and more. Zoom, WebX, whether they're inserting a video conference here what was a year ago novel. That one viral video of the guy with kids in the background doing stuff was funny and that’s not, but universal.

Robbie Fitzwater [00:02:21]. I mean that's that every day. Every person has adopted the “we're going to try and make it all work” thing. And whatever happens inside of our Zoom environment, it's just part of the standard operating procedure. I think everybody's also adopted the zoom uniform of the buttoned-up shirt with shorts below. 

Ryan Alford [00:03:17] Well, I'm glad we could reconnect and get the podcast back going after we talked. I've had a couple of guests since we last spoke. But, I know we wanted to talk today a little bit as we talked pre-show about the new normal for both business and marketing and holistically as the world pandemic seemed to touch everything right! 

Robbie Fitzwater [00:03:47] Just a little bit of everything, I don't know if there's anything that is shielded from this. Like every industry is impacted, everybody's life is impacted in some way. And if things are everybody's embracing that new role of like, you live and work at the same place, you eat and you eat and sleep at the same place and just everything happens in this one location that is your house or your apartment or your or wherever you're at. And you hit that cruising speed of like every day is the same. And there's no weekends or there's no weekdays or weekends anymore. It's just business as usual all the same. 

Ryan Alford [00:04:29] And that has been the strangest thing. It's funny you say that. I've been having a real hard time. We're obviously trying to keep normalcy for the kids and stuff like that. You always get a little off-balance to have a strange week or something like I can't remember what day it is you've been so busy, but like I'm having this real hard mental struggle with dividing like a weekend from the work week because obviously, I'm putting the work down as much as possible. But in our business, marketing and advertising I feel like I'm a little bit always on just available client service. So there's some of that always on even when I'm on the weekend. So I'm having a real hard time delineating days. 

Robbie Fitzwater [00:05:17] It's really crazy. And honestly, it's like you see it in the behavior across the board. I think that like working with some email clients, I would never suggest we're in a place where I would never suggest. You send an email at eight-thirty on a Friday night. Or eight-thirty on a Saturday night. Absolutely never. But right now, suddenly everybody's got that same week, weekday routine where that's probably when they're putting the kids to bed, that's probably when they're bringing their phones out and taking some time to relax on the sofa, which is when you want to be serving up, serving up information. But it's that consistency where it never really ends and the behavior change has been unique to see. I think some groups have seen a big spike in e-commerce sales like 11:00 PM or 12:00 p.m., which are much later than they normally would be. And then the people are sleeping in a little bit later and just not they don't have that same “I've got to get up and commute to work”. So their behavior has changed a little bit. It's really unique to see how that blend is happening pretty quickly now that we've hit that cruising speed of what life looks like on this side of it. 

Ryan Alford [00:06:33] And we talked about it in some ways, it's changed things, most certainly, but it appears, I think, to both of us to be. Gas on a fire that's been lit for a while and a lot of ways for the trends of business, the trends of sales and tactics and marketing as a whole I think it's escalated that ball rolling down the hill, don't you think? 

Robbie Fitzwater [00:07:11] Yes, it's really sped the progress of every industry in some different way. It's like where we saw e-commerce. That thing off in the distance for a lot of traditional retail businesses suddenly becomes something like Amazon and they necessarily need to have because that's where everybody's doing business. It sneaks in from a smaller portion of our economy and suddenly becomes a really large portion of our economy, like traditional. I think advertising is going to be thrown off. And some really unique ways, too, is without sports, without live sports, without a lot of new programming on television, or traditional television. Is traditional TV going to be as appealing as it was a year ago, or even billboards with fewer people driving and traffic down over 50 per cent, a lot of places, their billboard is going to be as appealing or radio with radio being down. Is that going to be as exciting for a lot of people as it is? It would be traditionally, but you see video game streaming. I think that's a fascinating insight into some of this ESPN doesn't have programming right now, so they're suddenly streaming video games. Does that make video game streaming a lot more realistic for a broader audience? And is this suddenly a new opportunity for a lot of people to take advantage of? So it's accelerated the progress that was happening, but it just shifted us almost 10 years really fast. So those are some examples and there's probably a lot more that are just really unique that industries are just shifting really quickly. And the way people engage in the behavior is really accepted fast and then accepted as the new normal. Like, again, like these zoom meetings we're on right now. 

Ryan Alford [00:09:02] I think it's funny you brought up I'm going to touch on a little bit because of a friend that's in sports. He'll probably beat me up if he hears this. And I don't know the exact terminology, but he's huge in sports, has a huge following on Twitter and being the voice of it, I've watched his career trajectory and watched Twitch, which is a huge growing platform for watching other people play Esports and video games in general. And again, it was one of those things that was rolling down the hills, definitely one of the faster-growing social platforms, if you want to call it that. It's a hybrid. 

Robbie Fitzwater [00:09:56] I think it definitely falls into the category of social platform. It's a space where people can come to connect around a common idea or something. But, I think it's probably one of the biggest up and coming social networks on the internet right now. 

Ryan Alford [00:10:14] So I think you're going to see advertisers and marketers with Esports again. We're already going there. So it's not like we're saying, “oh, look at this platform Twitch that just started in the pandemic”. No, this is becoming huge anyway. But again, with no other live sports, you've got NBA players playing each other for the live tournament they've had on ESPN. I think even the NBA was I think because I just was seeing at least the headlines on my sports feed. But again, out there with their race car drivers doing the virtual races, and I think you're going to see the interest in that become even greater because you're your people. You have captive audiences that want to watch some form of live unknown ending content and sports. And so you're going to see people trialing things that they may have been quasi interested in, but now they've got time on their hands. They can try it and see if they are interested in it. So which is naturally going to create more adoption, adoption of it. And so you're going to think if you see smart marketers and businesses thus advertising even more on these platforms. 

Robbie Fitzwater [00:11:39] I think some of those platforms offer those opportunities, but I think it's definitely one of those things, one of those places, a lot of people, a lot more people are going to be focusing time and attention. And honestly, I mean, marketing dollars go to our eyeballs, go. And because people spend so much time on the streaming platforms, like that's a really viable audience. And if depending on the streaming platform it is, depending on what the audience is, you probably have more data on that audience and probably understand the insights around that audience a lot better than you would traditional television. But you also probably have a captive audience of people who are really passionate about one specific thing and also probably jumping on board with some of them really. Well known streamers in that space, I'm sure their profile I know a lot of. Social influencers like travel influencers, your problem, your I guess your equity probably went down a little bit like a travel influencer, not being able to post every other place, but as a streamer and somebody in that space, their equity probably goes way up because you suddenly have a larger audience and you can command eyeballs the way that very few people can right now. And it's just less competition in the market because there are no sports, there are no travel influencers. There are so many industries that have fallen off and so many outlets that have just fallen off that it offers a lot of opportunities for people to discover new things and then for people to dive deeper into things they were already interested in. And the gaming space is so fascinating to me because I like sports, like video games. I will be the first person to tell you, “video games are not my sport”. I'm horrible at video games. I can do most things, but I'm a horrible video game player. But you see people who are streamers and people who are in that world and they love it. That's their jam. And while it isn't for everybody, like the riches are in the niches and they own the niches and so many unique ways that if you're a streamer and you have an audience like they, they trust you, they know you. And again, as a marketer, they can make it authentic. They can build an authentic relationship between your brand and that individual. So there's a lot of potential is coming through that the market probably needs to be aware of and probably have their eyes open to. That probably would have happened five years, 10 years from now. It's probably accelerated into this next year because of no Olympics, no live sports, no NBA. That's a big market of people who are just looking for things to do right now. 

Ryan Alford [00:14:21] I think if I'm counseling anyone, I know a lot of business owners listen to our podcast and a lot of my friends and colleagues and others. The one thing I just want to tell people, and some people, they're grasping this now. The world isn't going back to normal. This is not there's no going back. Don't get me wrong. We will congregate again. There will be these sports again. Like I'm not saying that I don't know. I'm not going to guess on dates, but back to what we started. If you're hoping and praying. And I was joking. I hope it is not a strategy, my friend, but that the world as we know it is going to come back. You need to be preparing yourself in your business for the realities that are in front of us. And because it's not going to be business as usual for anyone. 

Robbie Fitzwater [00:15:24] No, I think it's changing quickly and it's evolving fast and it's not even the same as it was a few weeks ago, I think now that we've hit our stride, you don't see the toilet paper isn't a hot commodity the way it was a few weeks ago. Like people can probably find toilet paper if you're desperate. You can really find at this point which is, we're going through that stage of where we had that initial shock to the system of, “oh, my gosh, what's going on”? We've got to hold ourselves and make sure everything's the world's not coming to an end. And now we've come out of that where we're able to take, “OK, we're safe and comfortable”, where we're here at home, we're alive. We're going to be fine. We have all of our necessities met. And now we're going up. But if those needs are met lower on that lower on that pyramid where you have your safety and security, you have your love and belonging, you can start moving up farther and farther. So even in purchasing patterns like that, the first week, everybody's going out buying bread, milk, toilet paper, those necessities that everybody needs. And you have to have it because you feel like the world’s coming to an end. You have transitioned from that to an “OK, let's go”. We have to function at home. We're going to need to know what life looks like on this side. So let's go get a webcam. Let's give it a ring light and let's get some really comfy pants to wear when we're on a zoom meeting because nobody can see what you're wearing, wearing down below. And we've fallen into that place like, OK, I'm going to get some home workout equipment and some things to do at home so I can feel like more of myself and I can work, I can function here. And we're gradually going up that ladder at this point, we're going to be looking for love and belonging. We're going to be looking for extreme esteem and self-actualization. So for some of those businesses, some of those purchases are coming back into the fold where they may be able to sell. I mean, athleisure clothing is probably going to be going up pretty soon because people know they're going to be spending more time at home. They want to be comfortable. It's thinking about what people need at this time and how their brains are trying to connect different dots around the pandemic, what's going on outside and how we can shelter from it here and then gradually start to become more comfortable in the new normal. 

Ryan Alford [00:18:02] And I think they say there are a million sayings on how many days it takes to change behavior and habits and all of that. But we're at 30 days now, so we're creating new habits and new procedures and new ways with which we do things. And it was an adjustment period. And I can't wait to go back now. New habits form. And so things like ‘take-out’ food and food delivery, it's out of necessity and must now for anyone at home that needs something besides groceries and still wants that luxury. But I think you're going to see an increase in these things where you take out a delivery may have been 15 to 20 percent of the average restaurant's business, even when they get a vaccine, even when it goes all clear, yes, there might be an initial rush back, but we've inbred. We've created new habits and new things where, “oh, that food can be taken out”. Oh, I can enjoy it at home. I think you're going to see those numbers teeter in the 40 to 50 percent range because people are just going to be getting ingrained with new behaviors. 

Robbie Fitzwater [00:19:24] I mean, especially with food and those necessities that people thought, “OK, I could never do that” in the past, or there's a lot of things that people thought “I can never do or I can ever try to become normal and honestly like especially with food and groceries we've been using and ordering from Publix here in Greenville. But it's fantastic because we don't have to go through the logistical nightmare of “OK, I've got our 10-month-old and I can get there pushing around in the stroller and push a shopping cart”. At the same time. It's suddenly, “Hey, we're going to order this through an app on our phone and they're going to deliver it in a few hours, hopefully”. And it's going to be pretty seamless. And next time we want to order something, they've already got our grocery list built for us. If we make it consistent, then that's really easy for us. And it's the behavior that people are probably not going to go back to. If I mean, sometimes you want to go to a place and discover new things, but if that's a higher level of convenience and saving you time and energy, then it's an absolute transition into a new normal because it's so much more simple where you can just have a consistent running grocery list with your spouse and yourself or whoever else, and add things to an entire list. I think we'll probably see like a dart, a few dark grocery stores pop up around this area because we don't necessarily need a forward-facing Publix for people to search around for things. We could probably have things picked up from a storage location and brought to your house. So not as much overhead, not as many employees. And we'll probably see a little bit more efficiency there too. 

Ryan Alford [00:21:01] And then you're going to see things like the ones that win the game with Amazon now cross-selling up, selling called the digital point of, grocery stores are built our marketing machines, they're built in a certain order for you to purchase things in caps marketing. The bread is always as far away as possible. The milk they want you to go buy as many. While that's next to that item. I mean strategically and I'm not talking about peanut butter and jelly or like I'm talking like this is strategy and point of sale. You're going to see that same thing, transfer to every industry. And yes, some of that's e-commerce one on one. But industries that have historically been e-commerce driven are going to have to rethink the marketing and positioning of those online shopping experiences. 

Robbie Fitzwater [00:22:04] I think for this new world “brand” becomes a more important topic because of that being brand and not merely a commodity. I don't think you can play the price game as much in some cases if you're purchasing thrown into the cart. You don't see some price wars going on in real-time. So I think that brand experience becomes even more important because it's probably going to be less switching. So once you purchase something, there's not as much likeliness of approaching that purchase. If you're on Amazon, they're probably going to be more aggressive around replenishable products than creating Amazon Basics. Replenishable products that they can start replacing in people's baskets or offering that option. So, there's probably a lot more and improvement that brands could be doing to make sure they establish themselves as a value-added service or a differentiated brand as opposed to the commodity that everybody else falls into. You see it in grocery, but if you're going to be taking a lot of other industries into that same space, the brands that do really well in the e-commerce space that isn’t trying to battle Amazon are the brands that differentiate themselves with brands. And that's the ones that can develop a relationship and develop a consistent buying pattern with their customers. So I think those are the ones that probably really need to understand brands that aren't doing that, probably need to get on board with it and start to understand what's different about us or what will make people actually want to come to us one time and then come back. So it's going to become more and more important. And you're probably going to be, again, with less brick and mortar sales coming right now. And in the near term, how are you going to react to that larger marketplace of e-commerce? 

Ryan Alford [00:24:06] Speaking of Amazon now's the time if you weren't already ahead of this with your brand or your e-commerce and you think, “well, it's too late, now's the time to get that up as fast as possible,” because you've got, wounded warrior a little bit down because everyone's overloaded them. They're only serving up essentials. Their biggest differentiators are pretty much muted right now. And so if you can get up and go because I imagine they're going to be, they're going to be dealing with this for at least a month or two. 

Robbie Fitzwater [00:24:41] I think as of April 15th, all the shipping what chip estimate is shipping dates for just about everything that May 7th last was where we were looking last night, so May 7th. So the differentiator of the instant delivery and then the differentiator of having everything in one basket to purchase isn't there. And also for e-commerce businesses, I mentioned, I mentioned and I think it may be the last time, I think long term digital prices are going to go up, but in the short term, they are so low. It's like buying Facebook ads in  2015. Suddenly there's 40 percent, 40 percent less, 50 percent less in some industries because travel, tourism, all of these industries have just completely fallen off the radar. So the inventory is already up. Plus people are spending a lot more time on their phones. So there's even more opportunity for those ads to be served up. So right now, it's cheaper and it's a lot more efficient. You don't have the biggest competition you're going to face. So right now, doubling down on the ecommerce strategy, like that's super important. And you see some retailers out there that have had their weeks hit lately have been like Black Friday and they're trying to reverse engineer their site to not convert as quickly because their warehouses can't keep up with it. So it's fascinating to see how fast some of these businesses can grow off the back of Amazon, not necessarily working as efficiently and I mean as being a lot cheaper than they normally would be. 

Ryan Alford [00:26:15] Yes, and I've personally bought a couple of things that we needed for work on the technical side that I would have. I went to Amazon, but to your point, it was three or four weeks and I went straight to somewhere else. It was actually a little cheaper and I got it in three days. Now, there are some shipping delays around for everyone on some things, depending on where you are and stuff like that. But, I felt, “now's the time to take advantage and you need to be doing it anyway”. Again, this is a ball that was rolling downhill anyway. And if you weren't already on it, you need to be on it. If you have a direct to consumer opportunity and leveraging this time and whatever, however long it might be with Amazon, and you may sell on Amazon, it's not to say that's not a legitimate platform for selling for a lot of people, but now's the time to be building your customer base. And, everyone has had their own channels before. They are thanking their lucky stars that they invested in it. 

Robbie Fitzwater [00:27:32] The best part about it is afterwards when this gold rush may end, where industries come back online, Amazon gets back up and running at full steam, they're going to be stronger than ever. I think there's probably going to be a lot of consolidation of power with Amazon after this because some of the smaller players are going to drop off and people are going to be purchasing more consistent products on Amazon and going to Amazon for some of those first purchases. So there will be a consolidation of power. I'm sure a lot of people have actually joined Prime since it's happened because they just want Amazon Prime video right now. So they certainly have that option they may not have had before. But once that right now for those businesses and brands that are they have that opportunity, like they also have an opportunity to retain those customers. Like now is the time that they need to be opening that door and then doubling down on owning that relationship, get to know their customers, building a relationship. And if you're not extremely busy and you're not growing faster, you can handle taking this time to really double down on things that don't normally scale because you have that time to invest with those core customers who are going to be the core to see you through this and are going to be your biggest advocates after this is slowed down a little bit more or when the dust settles a little bit more than it is right now. I think that one really unique piece of this is that retention strategy and how do you really manage those relationships in the digital space suddenly when a lot of brick and mortar retailers roll out the red carpet for somebody in-store, but they don't always transition that relationship to an online space. They suddenly have this opportunity to do just that and really make an impact with their client base. I think it's going to be cool to; we talked about the innovation happening last time, but some of those other innovations that can happen there, because if your customer in a really intimate way, a lot of good information to share. And you have a lot of people who are the fires under there. You have the fire under them to try and make the shift really quickly. And they're going to take a lot of those unique skills and unique information that they knew as an expert in that space and bring it to digital space and at a scale that really works and a large and a large capacity because they're bringing their expertise and knowledge to a digital climate, which doesn't always have a lot of that information. 

Ryan Alford [00:29:58] Totally agree. Is there anything tactical for people listening – what we're seeing is the new normal? Is there anything that we haven't covered one or two things on your list or in your mind that this will be the new normal? And whether you're not necessarily guessing the future, but assuming by the nature of what's happening, is there one or two nuggets you want to drop on things you think are going to be that new normal? 

Robbie Fitzwater [00:30:50] I think in the near term, I expect people to be spending more time on their phones, more time on screen. So as a marketer, I'm always thinking, where's behavior going and what does that translate to? So again, we've seen a really dramatic increase in the amount of screen time the average adult in the US or the average adult has on their phone because they suddenly don't have that commute. So that's an hour or 30 minutes more of the day that they can consume media and consume information. So a lot of that screen time is going to translate to more buying, more purchases being made online, and then also more opportunity for brands to connect. Like there's a reason Google and Facebook really want self-driving cars, gets more media you can consume during the day. But I think that online behavior of spending more time on the phone is going to be there. And I think communicating and translating and transacting and more ways. And that space is going to also be there. So I think more online mobile purchasing is going to continue to rise. I think people are going to feel more comfortable making purchases on a mobile device that they may not have had in the past, where you're going to have more a spur of moment decisions being made on a mobile device than you would when people would normally be doing more heavy lifting on their computer. So I think people being able to find their community in ways that are going to be more interesting to them, more contextual to their life. And I also think brands are going to start to invest in a lot more content because people are going to be spending more time consuming that content. And with that quality content is going to be a lot more opportunities for people to differentiate themselves in that space, too. Again, I think brands are going to be more important coming out of this. So I think from that perspective, if you can help, if you can give people an outlet through your brand, then you really win because people are looking for outlets in different ways. People are looking for ways to manage their time or something that better suits their needs. And for businesses, that's going to ideally fit right in line with that. And then I keep thinking is like, if you can spend this time turning your good customers into your great customers; really focus on who that customer is; what their needs are and how to really maintain that relationship. Because if you can develop a differentiated relationship with Amazon, the big guy, the big kid on the block comes back into play. It's not going to be as strong because you've laid the groundwork for something that's a lot more intimate, a lot more personal and can't be scaled the same way that Amazon can scale everything else.

Ryan Alford [00:33:34] I think we've covered the big hitters. I think you summed them up nicely. And I keep going back to the restaurant thing, probably, being an agency that worked with a few clients, and especially with the pivot that they've had to do to take out and all of that. But I would be thinking about the way with which I'm going to use the restaurant as an example, but I think it applies to any industry, law, insurance, whatever. I think the impact is going to be there. I think there are people that are going to change their entire concept. Like a restaurant is going to change your concept. They're gonna realize, “hey, this doesn't deliver”. Well, this is not good food, a good recipe for delivery. This is not a good recipe for takeout. There's just stuff that doesn't translate. We talked with the restaurant, a group we're actually having restaurateurs call us because we have a reputation in that space and we've been counseling them online, ordering a lot of things. And so we have some forward-thinking groups that are out there going, hey, want to work with you. And we're having strategic discussions with them. And, they're thinking about it the way they should. They're thinking, we're probably going to redo our concept because we know that this is going to stay and that and we didn't get it dish by dish. But I think it's a good and a good parallel that you need to be thinking about the services that you offer and in this new normal, how you need to be serving them up. If there's a new recipe, if there's a new way, not obviously digital is going to be huge. Obviously, ecommerce, those kind of things. But I'm thinking even more in the meat of it. The recipes of these things, you need to be thinking about them. We can't go down the list by list, but I think that's the way business owners need to be thinking about what does this means for again, the restaurant analogy is that it wasn't set up. This great, wonderful pasta dish is awesome. Every time someone comes and sits and eat and I give it the firehouse analogy, I firehouse to go file subs are delicious in the firehouse because they're steamed and they're warm and they're wonderful. But to go firehouse, by the time you get home, it's like I could have just had a subway and no brand favoritism here. But, but that's what you've got to think about or that or think about their packaging. How do they heat that steam in their whatever that is to keep that experience? And so the blending of these recipes thinking about the recipe of your business differently, given the new normal. And then lastly, I have been so far against I like to be more practical in my recommendations, the whole AVR thing. But I will say this. Whoever can crack the code for retail experience, that is as much as possible, I give the examples sometimes because I know department store shopping, again, back to the grocery store strategically laid out. But you can go around and whoever can blend the digital world with the physical world in the VR space or the airspace to whether it's you're walking into the virtual dressing room and you're able to try these things on. And whoever can crack that code fastest and best is going to make a lot of money and they're going to sell it to other people. And you're going to have advertising in these VR spaces and marketing. You're going to go into virtual dressing rooms and there's going to be a billboard on the wall. I can't help but think that that's coming. But whoever can crack that code the fastest will win. 

Robbie Fitzwater[00:37:35] It definitely will be. But it's really a case, though, because you've seen department stores. It's been a consistent downward trend. But this takes those businesses and turns them into a crash and plane to less of those opportunities for discovery in the real, in the short term in the real world. And suddenly you need something like that to go try on something. You can't go to the mall because they may not be there in some cases. So a lot of those department stores may be disrupted. But I think that's a good call out and that that VR experience is going to be hopefully whoever does make that work. Again, people are looking for an outlet and a way to spend some time. That's an escape and that's something novel and new and unique. Right now, we're in a time with the novel, new and unique, where that's just the new normal so that behavior is going to be a lot more accessible. 

Ryan Alford[00:38:42] And I think that will be done where I don't get to feel like I just wrote a roller coaster when I put the goggles on for thirty seconds. You figure out that we would win. 

Robbie Fitzwater [00:38:53] So people over 30 have a little bit more trouble. So I'm on that side of things, too. Now I'm going to feel like I just got off a roller coaster. But it's trying to make that accessible, make it easy and not make your brain freak out and think it's just the world's floor spending all the time. But then to in the restaurant space, like how much money could a restaurant save if they don't if they take out the overhead of that full physical restaurant like if they're just a space for pricey restaurants, consolidate, maybe that you have a bunch of restaurants teamed up and they take over a bunch of J.C. Penney's and they just consolidate in there.

Ryan Alford [00:39:39] New York City has some of the bigger cities had these Zubari kitchens, almost like they set them up. They were one hundred percent like that. They didn't even have it. So that was that again coming. But now it's going to escalate quickly. 

Robbie Fitzwater [00:39:56] I mean, the storefront, the physical storefront, maybe, maybe dropping down. But the digital storefront is that much more important. It is. Again we could go for it, we could go for a little bit longer than the people on the podcast would probably appreciate. 

Ryan Alford [00:40:11] So I think we gave him some good meat today. Rob, you always appreciate it, brother, and stay safe. And I know we'll be talking and working through some projects on different things, but look forward to the next one. And this was fun. This is the latest episode of the Radical Company Podcast. Follow us online at Radical.company and you can find us on Instagram. Radical_results. Thanks to Robbie Fitzwater. You can find Robbie on all the social media channels or just go to the Clemson University directory. 

Robbie Fitzwater[00:40:46] Right. So, it's been a pleasure. And again, it's always fun to talk.

Robbie Fitzwater

Marketing Strategist