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Open Mic with Josh, Reiley, and Ryan: Christmas traditions, Netflix Recommendations, Social Media Frustrations, and More

December 17, 2020

Open Mic with Josh, Reiley, and Ryan: Christmas traditions, Netflix Recommendations, Social Media Frustrations, and More
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Welcome to the first open mic conversation with all The Radcast regulars, host Ryan Alford, co-host Josh Hill, and producer Reiley Clark.


Happy Thursday and welcome to the first open mic conversation with all The Radcast regulars: Your host Ryan Alford, co-host Josh Hill, and producer Reiley Clark.

Open mic is a time where we talk about life, marketing, and social media.

Enjoyed this episode? Then share it on Instagram and tag us @the.rad.cast | Do you want to hear more from our host? - Give him a follow @ryanalford on Instagram. | The Radcast is a product of @radical_results | #theradcast

Transcript

Ryan Alford [00:00:23] Hey guys, what's up? Welcome to the latest edition of the Radcast. We'll call it a not so special edition because we’re doing this quite regularly. If you're watching the video, you'll see this live. But we're in the cozy comforts of the new Rad Cast studio, which includes a nice ambiance of a fireplace. Thank you, Reiley. 

Reiley Clark [00:00:46] Yes, you're welcome. 

Ryan Alford [00:00:48] You've got Josh Hill, our Digital Media manager here at Radical. Josh, good to have you, as always. 

Josh Hill : Good to be here. 

Ryan Alford: And of course, the lovely Reiley Clark, host, producer, Madame extraordinaire 

Reiley Clark [00:00:57] Yes, thank you. It’s good to be back. Thank you. I appreciate all the titles. 

Ryan Alford [00:01:07] Yeah. What else do we like to give people? We like to give people lots of titles so they have the power to do lots of different tasks here. 

Reiley Clark [00:01:14] That is absolutely true. 

Ryan Alford [00:01:18] I mean how many hats can we all wear? 

Reiley Clark [00:01:22] I think it's good. I think it's good. How's life for guys like what's been going on?

Ryan Alford [00:01:27] Holidays for the Alford family. Chasing an elf around every morning. My kids come out wondering where he is and I and my wife having to remember to decorate, hide him. And she bought like this kit, like for these different outfits that he gets in. And every night about 10:00, I'm like half asleep and she's gone that damn elf. I got her remembering what it is. So it's fun. I guess I curse it, but it is not fun when you wake up in a cold sweat at 1:00 a.m wondering “did we do the elf?” But it's right. The kids love it. So we're in the throes of holiday traditions and all that.

Josh Hill [00:02:07] Yeah. Do you feel like you still hate him enough to, like, hang him from the Christmas tree, like you're talking about? Is it getting to that point? 

Ryan Alford [00:02:12] Might be last night. Like I'll probably be like a spoof version of it. I'll take it for the old Gram spoofers. And then we're and then where we actually really put them, 

Josh Hill [00:02:25] This is some sort of like elf Protective Services I can call. 

Reiley Clark [00:02:29] Yeah, there we go. 

Ryan Alford [00:02:32] But I mean, it's cool. The kids are getting excited for old Santa Claus. 

Josh Hill [00:02:44] We 'll do the milk and cookies and all that?

Ryan Alford [00:02:46] Yeah we'll do all that. It's the normal traditions and. A few little things that we do. But I think it's, we're a pretty standard household other than the 5 Christmas trees which everyone now can relate to having been to our house. We had the holiday party. 

Josh Hill [00:03:05] Yeah. That was super fun. 

Ryan Alford [00:03:06] It was fun Radical Christmas party. 

Josh Hill [00:03:09] Oh it's beautiful. 

Reiley Clark [00:03:10] Oh I like that. 

Josh Hill [00:03:11] I should have taken one home. I don't have a I don't have a Christmas tree in my apartment yet. Yeah. Just, just drawing one on the wall. 

Reiley Clark [00:03:18] But hey you could; I've seen some people, they take like well thumbtacks and then they basically make a Garland thing like just right on the wall. You could essentially just do that and then just put little bulbs just right on the garland. You can, you know, a little DIY could be the move. This is getting Dana's little DIY all session going on here. 

Ryan Alford [00:03:41] You could have snuck away with my wife, would have it eventually, but you could have just taken one, walked out the door, pre-decorated. All done for you. 

Reiley Clark [00:03:50] And you don't think she would have noticed that? 

Ryan Alford [00:03:53] Oh, maybe. Like Clayton's room is in the front of our loft and with our blended family, he's only there half the time. And so I think it might have taken a couple days potentially, but she would have definitely noticed it once you walked in there. 

Josh Hill [00:04:09] I’d just blame it on the elf. 

Ryan Alford [00:04:13] So how are things going at work, Josh? 

Josh Hill [00:04:16] Good. It's the crunch time of getting all the holiday stuff and most of the holiday ads are out and about. They're running. They're getting people. Just kind of tying up the air really at this point, getting ready for next year and making sure all the bands are tired of the loose knots and stuff. Setting up new expectations for 2021 with all of our clients, really wanting to take some big progressive steps, get on top of new trends and stuff. Especially creatively, text wise, on captions and stuff. And then, a lot of new tools are coming out. 

Ryan Alford [00:05:00] Before we go down that path, I really enjoyed that we landed on Santa Claus. We found him. We work with a furniture company called Jimmys, really great guys. And we've been able to do some really cool holiday spots that I wasn't sure we'd be able to pull off with covid and all those things. But, we found a local Santa Claus that I swear is in the top 10 best Santa Clauses I've ever seen. He's a great big dude. He kind of looks the part. He's got the beard. He's got a legit outfit that I think he spent two grand on or something. It may be a $600 outfit but it’s a $2000-looking outfit. The super big bill, everything else like legit. And so we did a great commercial spot for Jimmys. So then we brought them back in for some micro content for both, our Radical team and then a few other clients. And so was pretty pumped with all of that. 

Josh Hill [00:06:00] It was great for me to work with him. The fun part of my job is I'll be in a meeting talking about going over reports like, oh, we did this many impressions. This frequency drove this many conversions. And then I get out of the meeting and put on a burger suit and sit on Santa's lap 

Ryan Alford [00:06:21] Hey back to wearing many hats here. Yeah, this is a boutique agency. We really push hard for you to show all their talents 

Josh Hill [00:06:28] Really, at Radical, I'm an actor and I'm the onsite factor. And then I do the ads on the side. 

Ryan Alford [00:06:34] I think so. I mean, but you are a hell of an actor. I, I will dare say some of our best content comes from Josh going into indie character or just being yourself. I'm not sure which one. And I talk about like when we did the hot mic one a few. 

Josh Hill [00:06:51] I don't think even I know. 

Ryan Alford [00:06:53] Which one is it? Yeah. 

Josh Hill [00:06:54] It's all blended together. I've lost myself. 

Ryan Alford [00:06:57] So I've enjoyed the Santa stuff and Burger Boy's been a hit with a local client that we work with. Ultio Burger. They do have a great burger. So it's been interesting seeing all the content come to life for the holidays. 

Reiley Clark [00:07:15] Are there any holiday traditions you guys really do like with your family? I mean I know you kind of talked about like you all do elf on the shelf, like the cookies and milk, and that kind of thing. But is there anything that you feel like is just your big holiday tradition that it just doesn't necessarily feel like the holidays like without it. Do you have one of those? 

Josh Hill [00:07:34] We do a Christmas Eve dinner. And then we always follow up on Christmas Day with soup. 

Reiley Clark[00:07:44] What kind of soup is it? A special kind of soup. 

Josh Hill [00:07:46] There's always three kinds. My grandma used to always make a veggie soup, some chili, and it's always those two staples and occasionally have like a third like extra one, too. But every year for Christmas. 

Reiley Clark [00:08:00] We would always do this game called Mafia. And I feel like there's probably different versions of it. It's either a killer or mafia or whatever. And again and I mean, you say a name like - it sounds horrible, but it's a super fun game because it's a card game, essentially, but you have your whole group of people. And normally for family things, at least back in West Virginia, we would have like a pretty big group of family that would be there and we'd all play this game. But it's like you have the Queens, you have the Kings, and then you have the Ace in the Queens or the Mafia. The Kings are the cop. The Ace is the doctor. And if you get a number card, the rest of you are just townspeople. OK, so it's on its own and it's really not that complicated. But the Queen is like the one that's like trying to basically kill the rest of the people. So  the narrator is like, OK, everyone, close your eyes, go to sleep. Everyone's eyes close? And then the narrator will say, OK, Mafia wake up and the Mafia points to someone they're trying to kill. And it is basically the cops trying to figure out who the mafia are, the doctors trying to save the potential townspeople. Ah, it's a fun game. It is a fun game, but it causes arguments that you wouldn't believe.

Josh Hill [00:09:20] I can tell you that your family must be like a huge game family because every time I'm around, like outside of work, it's like a new game proposal. She knows any card game and then all of the rules. She's on top of it. 

Ryan Alford [00:09:38] Our traditions are pretty normal. Like, my parents are divorced and we go to my mom who lives in Colombia, which is a couple of hours, or less than a couple hours away from Greenville where we're at and go down to hers the weekend before the holidays. And she cooks a big meal and we do gifts with her. And yeah, there's these micro traditions, I guess, that we do every year. And then my dad, we usually would cook like a prime rib or something like sometimes Christmas eve, sometimes Christmas Day. We do it depending on the schedule with the kids. I know because about we flip every other year like we have them on Christmas Eve. We get them at least on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day, depending on the year. And, I mean, but there's some standard things. And then we always watch Christmas vacation. Classic movies. And then I watch Christmas Story on the channels or the TBS or something shows the twenty four hours of Christmas story. So we get that in at least four times. It's just kind of on replay. 

Reiley Clark [00:10:46] Were you guys in like the Hallmark movies at all? Well you guys are I hate to say it this way, but I don't even know if you guys would have really watched it. I feel like I don't know if it's just more of a girl thing or whatever. Actually, my brother liked some of them. I mean, I feel like there are some guys I know that like some of them. But, have you seen it?

Josh Hill [00:11:07] I've seen them, but genuinely do not know how or why, but I've seen them. That's my only opinion on them, is, I've seen them. 

Reiley Clark [00:11:19] Their storylines always get to me. 

Ryan Alford [00:11:21] I can’t say I cannot watch any Hallmark movies, really. 

Josh Hill [00:11:24] I don't think I chose to watch them. 

Reiley Clark [00:11:25] I don't know. So I know that you're missing out either, to be honest, because they're very interesting. 

Josh Hill [00:11:32] They're not. because they're kind of the same thing every time to someone's back in their hometown. They're like, oh. 

Reiley Clark [00:11:42] But don't you love guessing? Like you're like, OK, is she going to leave him? 

Ryan Alford [00:11:49] It is very formulaic, having not even watched them, I know they're all formulaic on some level. Oh yeah. Like a soap opera or something else. Like, it's kind of the beauty antagonist hero challenge, issue resolution, happy, touchy feely. And they summarize 

Riley Clark [00:12:12] it. Yes, but I do have a fun fact for you guys, actually. Did that every Hallmark Christmas movie have to have a requirement of -- for example, there has to be someone decorating a Christmas tree. There has to be hot chocolate in front of a fireplace. There has to be lighting of the tree. Like there has to be all these things and it has to be in every Christmas movie. Is that kind of crazy to think about? I guess it's probably really not that crazy. 

Josh Hill [00:12:41] Do we need to add those for every Christmas ad we do. Yeah, I guess adopt some of those rules. So I guess we're not running any right now, if that's the case.

Reiley Clark [00:12:50] Is there anything going on like social media wise that you guys have noticed? I mean, I've picked up that Facebook is having a new app that's kind of coming out? Well, actually, I feel like it's an app that's been out, but I think they're revamping this app to create more collaboration for musicians to, like, come into the scene. And basically, it's trying to pick up what TiKTok kind of, I don’t want to say, lost track of. But I feel like Tik Tok kind of became more almost a vine kind of territory a little bit, and not necessarily that like musically kind of intentional what it was originally kind of meant to do. But, do you guys like have you guys heard about that at all? 

Josh Hill [00:13:30] I've looked into it. I mean, it's one of those, like TikTok kind of grown into this spot where it's sort of like YouTube, where it's a platform and it's not like one thing. There's like a lot of different avenues you can go down. There's comedy, there's still the lip synching with dancing, like musical.ly was. And then there's also cooking tutorials, like I've watched copywriting how tos and like doctors tell stories, stuff like that. I mean, obviously most of this is ridiculousness, but which is the beauty of it. But it seems like they're going for like just a very small segment of Tik Tok where it's like. Musicians would download a Tik Tok and then add their piece on it and then re-upload, it seems like they're kind of going off of that. I don't know. It could be fun. I mean, it seems like it really seems like a thing for, like copy musicians kind of do it as a side thing. I don't really see it as a way to kind of grow. You're like an audience if you are an artist or anything, right? 

Ryan Alford [00:14:32] I feel like it's a reaction because TikTok is expanded past the music. Like you mentioned, Josh and I just Facebook is getting so bloated with stuff like that. And I know that it's meant to be the hub of everything like, but it's like when does it end? I don't know. Yeah, I guess if 

Reiley Clark [00:14:52] You feel like it's trying to be Google of social media?

Ryan Alford [00:14:54] Oh, absolutely. Yeah. 

Josh Hill [00:14:56] Yeah. I think they think Facebook tends to do that often where they just kind of reiterate like a half baked version of something else. And I feel like it's all these moves just to kind of avoid the whole I mean, avoiding the whole monopoly thing.

Ryan Alford [00:15:14] Like Facebook watch. Since it's gotten more into the navigation online that I do watch, I think I almost accidentally hit the button, actually meaning to go to Marketplace. I do like to use Marketplace, I will say that. And I don't even buy that much stuff. I just kind of shop around like, “oh, that's cool.” That baseball card that I'll never buy, it's like, but I accidentally hit the Watch button and catch a few. And there's a lot of, I don't know why, there's like magicians and people that like are obviously doing videos to get people to watch longer than three seconds. I'm watching it going, all right. I know what they're doing here. 

Josh Hill [00:15:53] I'm starting to think people don't want a centralized social hub because I think they enjoy having the ability of if they don't want this portion of social media, they don't have to have that app like. So they have Instagram for their images, some videos. So if they don't want to watch the ten minute videos on YouTube, they don't have to have it, they don't  have to go to YouTube. And the same with Twitter. You don't care to read statuses like Facebook. You have to see everything.You don't have to have Twitter I think. 

Reiley Clark [00:16:22] Speaking of Twitter, have you seen that Twitter is starting to roll out shareable versions for Instagram stories with tweets, and that way you can just send it directly to other platforms. Have you seen that? 

Josh Hill [00:16:35] So it's like an integrated cross platform? Like their Fleets? 

Reiley Clark [00:16:38] That's what I understood it to say. Well, is that weird to think about? 

Josh Hill [00:16:43] The only people I've seen use their Twitter stories or fleets, which I kind of don't want to call it that. But it's also hilariously funny. 

Ryan Alford [00:16:52] It's a I don't know why I feel uncomfortable saying 'Fleets', but I do. 

Josh Hill [00:16:59] There's a very small audience here who would understand why it's kind of inappropriately funny, but I'll just leave it there. 

Ryan Alford [00:17:07] That's maybe that's where my mind goes. Will see how fleeting it really is. 

Josh Hill [00:17:14] Well I know exactly. Do you feel like these stories are even beneficial in all the social media platforms? 

Ryan Alford [00:17:19] I think that for certain platforms, yes. But, it kind of  relates to saying what Facebook thing. Everything is so splintered now, like attention is so splintered. You got Snapchat, which we barely even talk about, which I know you both use. And I don't, um. And I'm not saying you use it a lot, but I know you have it now and use it occasionally. Yeah. Yeah. And not to stereotype. I'm going by stereotypes. Reiley probably uses it more than any of us. But it's just like Snapchat and Facebook and Instagram and TikTok and Twitter and YouTube and then LinkedIn. And then you've got the subcategories within each write stories, post whatever. And I don't know, it's just overwhelming. And look, we're in the business. We make these decisions every day. We probably should focus but it's splintered like. 

Reiley Clark [00:18:30] But what does that balance look like? 

Josh Hill [00:18:35] I mean like with it's one of the things that's like I think brands are the platforms that should stay differentiated. And like I understand there's like innovating and adapting and like it seems like they're thinking they're adapting by adding stories to their platform. But I don't think it's doing it the way that they think they are now. Like, they're all different environments. You can say it's OK to not have stories on your social media platform.

Ryan Alford [00:19:00] And I liked it when it first came on LinkedIn stories make sense to me because it gives you a place to do something a little different with LinkedIn. It made sense, but I can't find time to get to it, not for myself. 

Reiley Clark [00:19:24] No. I mean, and the other thing is, I have hardly seen a lot of people even really take advantage of it because they are because my other thing is I don't necessarily want LinkedIn to become Facebook like. And I feel like it's kind of starting to gravitate that way because some people are just sharing, which, don't get me wrong; I think it's very important to have this emotional aspect of business and marketing. We talk about that all the time, but there are some things that I feel like that could have just been a Facebook post and would have been just fine on Facebook and not necessarily on LinkedIn, which I feel like sounds like “you can only post this and not that.” I'm not trying to say that, but it's like I don't necessarily look at LinkedIn and feel like this is like my Snapchat or feel like this is my Instagram.

Josh Hill [00:20:13] Facebook and LinkedIn probably have the biggest overlapping audience out of all of them. But I feel like that brings a lot of people who are like ``oh it's like “I use all social media platforms the same as opposed to being this is LinkedIn, this is not Facebook.” I need to share different things”. I think it's a generational thing too, because, I mean, people like I mean, people over 30 something or people who adapted like kind of later on in their life, maybe high school, college, but like whereas us we kind of like middle school is when like internet was like a significant portion of culture. It's like our culture and stuff. So we're digitally native. And so I feel like younger generations compartmentalize the platforms a little bit differently. 

Ryan Alford [00:21:06] That's true. And I think LinkedIn has grown a lot in the last 18 months and even more so with covid, people being home, having more time, I guess, potentially with devices and other things. And so I think you've seen it transform into this content hub that's similar to Facebook. Like you said, there's a definite overlap. And as long as I've been on Instagram, very few people on LinkedIn follow me at all on Instagram. Like it's very small overlap. Like a couple people, like I'll get DMs or like a message or something or like somebody will say “I know you, you’re so active on Instagram” or on LinkedIn, I'm like, yeah, yeah, it's that. And it's this interesting thing where I feel like it's just a lot of consumer brands on Instagram. But for B2B, LinkedIn is the platform. There's just very little and not that it's not that they should be, by the way, on Instagram necessarily. But there's just very little crossover with that. It's like just purely D2C Brands live and breathe there. And thus I think there are people do the employees and things like that, but not you just do not see much interaction with B2B brands on Instagram. And that's probably fitting. But I still feel like it's underserved in a way for business with Instagram.

Josh Hill [00:22:58] Yeah. I think a lot of people get on there just to get on there and then they kind of like don't really know where to go with it. They don't know why they're on there. Just because someone said, “oh, you have to be on here. Everyone's going digital.” 

Reiley Clark [00:23:15] I'm thinking about something that I saw come out today too. It's kind of back on that movie track. So I feel like I end up always circling back to movies and some shape or fashion. But did you see that Matthew McConaughey is coming out in the movie, the new Marvel movie? Well, Loki, like the initial one, but he's now like a silver fox in this movie. 

Ryan Alford [00:23:43] Is it Matthew McConaughey or is it Owen Wilson? 

Reiley Clark [00:23:47] Owen Wilson! Yes!

Ryan Alford [00:23:57] Yeah, I was kind of buying for a second because I could see Matthew McConaughey be a Marvel superhero on some level. I'm not sure he's not a superhero in real life. 

Josh Hill [00:24:07] But he's definitely one of the superheroes from a different planet though. 

Reiley Clark [00:24:11] Right. Are there any movies that you feel like are coming out, though, and at least in 2021 that you've heard of, that you're like, OK, I'm like so ready for this movie to come out like or a new show or something like that. I know Disney's about to drop, like. They are seriously about to just dump on the new on the platform. 

Josh Hill [00:24:32] Yeah. I saw a few TikToks joking about it -- they just opened up a box of Marvel like comics and like it turned these into movies. Have fun. What have we not done? Let's do this. 

Ryan Alford [00:24:46] Well, I think they were realizing with movie theaters are all but extinct, not forever, but with covid, and just barely getting going. I'm not going to really be up and going until summer blockbusters are probably just starting to somewhat embrace the streaming aspect of reality. That's going to be really interesting, watching there's certain things that genies come out of the bottle on like is that genie going back in the bottle? When are people going to really embrace going back? Maybe they're going to be all over it once they feel safe and there's a vaccine majorly out there, all that and people are going to die to get back to the movies. But that's going to be interesting to watch. I think most of the big theaters and a lot of the people that are pushed back forever now to see that's been nine months or however long, like I think we're going have to embrace this streaming thing if we want to make some money. 

Josh Hill [00:25:36] Yeah, I think so, too. Like a lot of the theaters beforehand were already, like, struggling without any external factors. And I mean, the movie experience is not always that great. You go in and it's like a rundown theater and it's fifteen dollars to watch something and it's like I'm paying less than this a month, have any movie on my own couch with my own food 

Ryan Alford [00:26:02] And at home on TVs and speakers and all that have gotten so better. So much better for everyone at all levels of economy. You don't have to have a ten thousand dollar movie theater room because everyone's got a big screen TV at home. And, if you're in an apartment, if you've got a 45 inch TV right. And you're in a small apartment that looks like a big screen. And they've got the 3-in-1 speakers. Hey, I'm kind of at a movie theater experience and I've got the access to my whole kitchen right here. And so it's like I think what you'll see if the theaters are going to survive is if they provide an experience like the ones that are doing like other things, like cocktails and food while watching the movie? Sign me up. 

Reiley Clark [00:26:51] Why wasn't that already a thing? 

Josh Hill [00:26:52] Those are doing really well. I mean, the lounge lounge seats, the reclining seats, the like leather ones, those are all like the ones that already had adapted to, like, making it a good experience versus being at home. That's like I feel like the only way they can make it work. 

Ryan Alford [00:27:08] And I think it's going to open up. I was starting to get into that with in-theater marketing. I think you're going to see some expansion in that area as the experiences within the theater and the things that you're doing and how you're interacting with it. I think you'll see the marketing within those experiences potentially increase because I've always liked it because you have a very candid audience. Those pre-movie ads -- I've always liked it for the right clients, not for every single client. The product placement always, always gets me with the roller coaster in the popcorn. Coca-Cola looks so delicious right there. No, I probably go by Coke or Coke Zero like half the time that ad pops up. 

Josh Hill [00:27:59] It tastes better after seeing it. 

Reiley Clark [00:28:03] It's true. I feel like I feel like there's probably a lot coming up in 2021, obviously as far as trends, movies, whatever it is. And I'm looking forward to all that coming out. And I know you guys are about to do an episode anyway on the 2021 trends. So that's going to be exciting to come out soon. But yeah, that'll be coming out Tuesday. 

Ryan Alford [00:28:21] I think trends on trends will be trending soon. Yeah, I think it should trend and I would like to see our trending episode trending. 

Josh Hill [00:28:33] It's going to trend, I mean it's going to be pretty trendy. We should probably dress pretty trendy. Talk about trendy things. Trends are on trend right now. But I think after the next few months, I think trends are going to be out. 

Reiley Clark [00:28:50] This is like the conversation: is water actually wet? That's literally what this just sounded like. 

Ryan Alford [00:29:15] Well, we have like 20 foot ceilings and like, there's our place where the hot water heater lives and the air filters and all that, like high up and you’ll need a ladder to get up there. But there's just a little door that looks like a dollhouse or a playhouse door up in the ceiling. That's like.. 

Reiley Clark [00:29:33] oh, that little tiny door? I know you're talking about now! Yeah, I do remember seeing that. 

Ryan Alford [00:29:38] But I haven't been watching it. When sports came back like summer had no sports practically at all. And so I'm not like an NFL guy at all. Usually it's college football. Clemson, Tigers. Go Tigers. But it has been away for so long. This whole, like, fall season and winter season I've been more into sports because it was gone all summer. And so it's kind of really curtailed any movie watching whatsoever. And now just kind of started talking about them while the other says Kobilka, I'm enjoying it. I really want, it's not silliness but lighthearted, like everything is just so intense with the news and everything else that I just need, like, some easy listening is easy, watching Fair. 

Josh Hill [00:30:36] It's funny you say that because this year, it's the first year I started watching in any format like anime and it's basically exactly that. It's just like I've been watching something from the 90s and some movies too, just beautiful scoring beautiful animations and like it'll be like a deep theme. But like all of a sudden they're just kicking, punching and things are exploding, like these giant robots. And it's like I can turn my mind off but also experience beautiful drawings. 

Ryan Alford [00:31:21] Yes, I will say. But to that end, like I was watching flipping through the other night, the mindless flipping you do before you go to bed. So I do. And Tommy Boy was on. So why are there no movies like this anymore? Just kind of mindless humor?

Josh Hill [00:31:37] it's been a couple that came out that really flew under the radar. There's one recently that was “They Came Together” and it was just a parody on every, like, rom com ever made, and it just kind of like mind melting because every single word that came out was just some kind of pun. People fell out of windows comically. Like it was just insane. Like Amy Poehler and Paul Rudd and it was very not popular. I don't know why. It makes me very sad. It was very old school, a lot of slapstick. 

Reiley Clark [00:32:14] The only other thing I've been watching is Master Of None. That's on Netflix. That's hilarious. 

Josh Hill [00:32:22] I’ve watched it like two or three times in college. I love that. It was like one of my favorite shows. 

Ryan Alford [00:32:30] Master of None?

Reiley Clark [00:32:31] Netflix show 

Josh Hill [00:32:34] Grenville Local; Greenville native.

Ryan Alford [00:32:40] I kind of makes fun of everyone or I shouldn’t have brought it up. I can't remember the name but the guy with the funky hair. Who shot some of it here at Greenville? 

Reiley Clark [00:33:00] I've watched the second one. I did. 

Ryan Alford [00:33:01] Was it good?

Reiley Clark [00:33:02] Yeah. 

Josh Hill [00:33:03] He shot the Halloween highway or. A way to go there every Halloween before. Like just to pick up my costume. I mean but gosh that Halloween store is beautiful though because they still have like unopened costumes from movies that came out in like 2001, like 1999 and it's like unopened brand new masks and stuff and it's like they just never sold and they're still there. 

Josh Hill [00:33:44] Follow along the Radcast on Instagram @the.rad.cast. Ryan's obviously on Instagram that you all should go follow him @RyanAlford. Josh is @JoshChill. Also, follow me @ReileyClark. 

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