A Top 25 Business & Marketing Podcast
Radical Podcast - Ryan sits down with Nick Gilley

January 31, 2019

Radical Podcast - Ryan sits down with Nick Gilley
Play Episode

In this episode Ryan sits down with long time friend/client/entrepreneur Nick Gilley in a wide ranging discussion from running a large general contracting company, to the ins and outs of gym ownership within the expansive fitness industry. As the owner and founder of Base 360 General Contracting & franchisee of Madabolic Greenville, Nick shares his inspiration for the business world and many key points of value for anyone interested in understanding what it’s like to live the life of a full blooded entrepreneur. Check this one out, and please leave us a review to let us know what you think!
.
Connect with Nick:
Website Links:
https://www.base-360.com - Base-360
http://www.madabolic.com/locations/madabolic-greenville - Madabolic, Greenville
.
Nick on Instagram:
@nlgilley
@base360_gc
@madgreenville
.
Connect with Ryan:
@RyanAlford
@Radical_Results
@GVLHustle


#AtTheSpeedOfNow
#NowThatsRadical


 

In this episode Ryan sits down with long time friend/client/entrepreneur Nick Gilley in a wide ranging discussion from running a large general contracting company, to the ins and outs of gym ownership within the expansive fitness industry. As the owner and founder of Base 360 General Contracting & franchisee of Madabolic Greenville, Nick shares his inspiration for the business world and many key points of value for anyone interested in understanding what it’s like to live the life of a full blooded entrepreneur. Check this one out, and please leave us a review to let us know what you think!

.

Connect with Nick:

Website Links:

https://www.base-360.com - Base-360

http://www.madabolic.com/locations/madabolic-greenville - Madabolic, Greenville

.

Nick on Instagram:

@nlgilley

@base360_gc

@madgreenville

.

Connect with Ryan:

@RyanAlford

@Radical_Results

@GVLHustle

 

 

#AtTheSpeedOfNow

#NowThatsRadical

Transcript

Ryan Alford [00:00:06] Hey, guys, welcome to today's podcast - Podcast Thursday, I'm joined by a good friend and client. We just try to do good work and stay close friends and people that I care about. And I consider Nick one of those. So, Nick, man, really great to have you on the Podcast. 

Nick Gilley [00:00:29] Yes, thank you. Happy to be here. 

Ryan Alford [00:00:30] So Nick has a couple of different business ventures. We thought it'd be great to talk with Nick about all of those things that he's been up to. But, I always start Nick and pretend it you and I don't even know each other but I know people would be interested in your story and your businesses and being an entrepreneur, having a family business, a lot of dynamics there and a lot of variation in the two businesses. I couldn't be more different in a lot of ways. I'm really excited. 

So, Nick, for everyone listening, I like to always start with that. I call it the Cliff Notes version. Share your background, what got you here today, that leading up to the businesses. But tell everyone about Nick Gilley. 

Nick Gilley [00:01:42] So, I am from Charlotte, North Carolina. I grew up there. My father had a construction company at that time but was never too much of an interest to me. I spent a lot of my youth on construction sites as jobs driving tractors, lawnmowers, digging ditches just because it was money and always had that endeavor in mind that I was wanting to not live off of my parents. 

Ryan Alford [00:02:14] That's always a good thing. 

Nick Gilley [00:02:15] So I had those jobs. I worked with my father at the same time, dozens of other jobs just throughout my youth, hustling. I spent a lot of my youth on Lake Norman so a lot of it was I needed gas money from the jet ski. So there was always a method behind what we were trying to do at the time. So it was a decision I made to stay in Charlotte because I love that city. So I ended up going to USC. Charlotte was a soccer player. We had some pretty successful soccer teams, so a lot of my time was spent playing soccer. So it hit that burnout face and decided I was just going to go to college and let go of the sports. So I went to USC, Charlotte, and didn't have too much in mind when we went there. I didn't think I was going into the construction field. I had watched my dad build somewhat of a construction empire from the construction site to the development. He was one of the first developers on Lake Norman, which anybody in there was like Norman's massive. It's one of the most overbuilt lakes in America, NASCAR country out there. It's crazy how much that's developed. And he was the first one out there, so he made millions. And then he got overextended with too much of one product and one price point. And that product dried up at the time. So, very quickly, all those years of effort was gone and I saw how volatile that development construction field was. I don't think I really want to be a part of that. So, tried to wrap my head around finance. So I got into a business school, got a finance degree and inherently knew that entrepreneurship was where I had a love. So I got a minor in entrepreneurship with a major in finance. So I say that I wasn't going to do construction. That's not really what I wanted. But as time went on, it was innate. It's the way my mind worked. I would see something and I would say, what can I build there, what can I create? It was there, it was ever-present, it was what I needed to be doing. So we started out with Base-360 in 2004, a year after I graduated college, Sarah and I decided to move to Greenville for no reason other than I watched Charlotte grow from, the 1980s to what it was in the early 2000s. And it was a monstrous growth. 

Ryan Alford [00:04:58] I mean, is Greenville on the same trajectory? Is it different or is it the same in because I was going to ask you that. I was born and raised in Greenville, lived in New York, done other things. But Charlotte was always the Mecca from Greenville even 25 years ago, 30 years ago. It is not like Charlotte hasn't been big. But is it still does it feel like that same trajectory? 

Nick Gilley [00:05:35] It does. Greenville's different and all the cities are different. And the fact of what the driving forces are for the growth, Charlotte banking. So, it was just go straight up with towers was filled with as many people as possible. So nationwide we can collect money on the banking side. Greenville's different and that we're much more spread out on the manufacturing side. So I don't see Greensville going vertical as Charlotte did and the City being having huge high rises. But at the same time, I see the Greenville Spartanburg upstate having the same trajectory city of Charlotte. So more sprawling, which is inherent, but same time I think that that growth is happening. We're positioned to be in the best area of the country because we have great job rates, wage rates. So we're getting all of these manufacturers from everywhere coming to rebuild. This is steady growth. 

Ryan Alford [00:06:30] Alright. I did towards you for a second, but I just back to curious. 

Nick Gilley [00:06:33] And seriously, we chose Greenville because it was not Charlotte that we could be one of the thousands here and said one of the millions there. And what better place to start a company than after seeing a city go on that trajectory trying to get in the beginning. So that's why I didn't know anybody. I just moved here, bought an old house, started renovating it, started a renovation company Base-360, which the name itself was taking your home base and bring it around full circle as in a renovation. So it was strictly a renovation company. And also I was a partner in another development company that worked out of Atlanta and South Georgia, and it was a historic restoration site. So I was able, at a very young age, to get a lot of experience on the act of rehabilitation – taking old structures, getting 45 percent tax credits from the government on that development cost to make these projects viable. So definitely a passion that we have that restoration side that we've always been a part of. So that company had a lot of great ideas. We focused where all these old buildings were, and that was rural Georgia is where all the buildings were. So we could never really find viable options for that. So that company disbanded a lot of great experience, a lot of great planning, a few projects under our belt. And, back in the green, well, we went and so it was really my focus from the late 2010s. I came up with a concept called The Elements. So even though we had the restoration side was my passion to build green. I wanted to be the greenest builder in Greenville. So it came up with a concept to do just that and build a neighborhood in North Main Area. And we quickly found that the market for Greenville and Green Building was we want it to be as efficient as we can and cost the same as everybody else. So it was this happy medium. We couldn't push the boundaries of Green Building just because people didn't pay for it. So, learning that medium of how to take construction and be on the front end of construction science. But, still trying to find a way to make it the same price that is everybody else. And we've done really well at that. So it's like our miles per gallon from where we built. And we're killing them. We have half of what code-built homes could, but buildings are built, his or her score. So just being smart, building practice. 

Ryan Alford [00:09:03] I mean, you just dove into the deep stuff here. How much has Sarah been involved on the real estate side with Base-360? I mean, is that marriage happening now or that's in the future? Or was she involved much in The Elements? And the Base-360 started and the trajectories rising.

Nick Gilley [00:09:37] So, going back to that, first The Elements neighborhood was 2007 through 2011, we were building out there. So it was a development. Being a developer is different than a general contractor. Again, this is the worst time in history to be a general contractor was or a developer was in that time frame. So we were able to maintain out there, built a building, finished it. So we just made it a rental building. So we rented out those units for years and were able to eventually sell them. But Sarah was a vital part of everything that we developed to sell. She sold it. However, I quickly determined that development was like Vegas money. So, if you're going to be a developer, you've got to be able to afford the loss of whatever that is you're doing. So I felt maybe this isn't for me and I need to start trying to make some singles and doubles and get back in the general contracting room. And that's when we got into custom homes. So I spent about a decade building some wonderful custom homes and 60 or 70 of those under my belt. I think I've had enough of the custom land. And that's Sarah wasn't part of that. I was working with a developer and he would sell the lots and I would interview the clients and build homes for him. When I have done stuff on my own to develop and sell shares always sold it. But we took a break from that for a while and now we're back into it again. 

Ryan Alford [00:11:03] So how was the custom home thing so hard? I mean, you did everything related to custom home building?

Nick Gilley [00:11:12] Right. Most stressful things in people's lives. 

Ryan Alford [00:11:17] People want what they want. And making people happy is hard. 

Nick Gilley [00:11:23] It very much is. And it's dramatically harder than it used to be. So before the age of Pinterest and seeing all these staged beautiful rooms that everybody, sees that they want, it was easier you could build from a plan set and people accept what they get. And now the level of expectation based on what they can see out there and the most beautiful homes in America, everybody wants the most beautiful home in America because they see pictures of that. So it is hard. It's a hard area of construction to be in. 

Ryan Alford [00:11:59] So let's talk about Base-360 doing a lot of unique projects. You did a lot of custom homes and now moving into more commercial development. So, a lot of cool stuff happening. Let's talk about your most recent projects. 

Nick Gilley [00:12:22] So it was about two and a half years ago. I said I think I've had my fair share of custom homes. Let's see what else we can do and I got the unlimited general contractors’ license taken care of. And I was like, “well, now we can build skyscrapers. Let's go find some clients. Let's do that.” Of course, we have to start small. She’s my first general contracting role was a lactation room. 

Ryan Alford [00:12:46] So we've come a long way. 

Nick Gilley [00:12:50] And I needed that on my resume. But, doing that got me in good with some of the largest architectural firms in Greenville. So that actually landed us the Gather GVL project was doing something off the wall like that. So they saw the quality that we could put in there. And they liked the personalities and they saw the creativity was what we were trying to do differently than everybody else is put this creative side to it, do something different than what everybody else is doing. And that's Base-360 in general that landed us the most unique job in downtown Greenville. Gather GVL - thirteen shipping containers, sixteen shipping containers, thirteen restaurants. So there are a few of those containers for storage. So right there in the West End behind the baseball stadium there, half-acre lot. We have every inch of it covered. We are using every possible square foot out there to make this concept happen. So you're talking about a perimeter of containers with a common courtyard, Astroturf courtyard with a stage back there and second-level steel canopy, second-level seating and common area. So modern-day food hall is a concept. So this project has been a bear. 

Ryan Alford [00:14:11] It's unique. You see using two by fours and still frames and you've got some general stuff that you're used to building with, right? And this is the case. 

Nick Gilley [00:14:22] You have developers who are the first time with this concept. Do you have an architecture firm? This never put together, shipping containers. You have a general contractor who is learning how to put together shipping containers. And then we have the containers that are actually made in Texas. There's another third party that designs and engineers these modular units and ship them is finished restaurants that pop on the site. And so the coordination of, basically half the country trying to pull this together, it's been interesting. So, we've had some delays out there. We're ready for containers right now on the project.

Ryan Alford [00:15:39] The development downtown has been interesting, I mean, Greenville's booming, and you've got, a couple of other little projects coming and going. You developed your own office there. And what do you make of the downtown scene? I wonder how do we reach this point? And I don't I totally agree with, the comparison with Charlotte, just different. We're not going vertical. It's more spread out. And you've got West Greenville. But I don't think we're there by any means, it's starting to take me, seventeen minutes to go, one and a half miles, not even at five o'clock. But it's like where do you what do you make of all the growth and just the general feel and culture. 

Nick Gilley [00:16:27] Well it's inherent. It doesn't help that we're continually named one of the top ten cities in America to be at. So you're going to have people coming. And when your name that and you have the job growth that we have it's inherent. People are going to keep coming. We have to lean on our city, the city council, to properly plan our public transportation is garbage in Greenville that they have to do a better job. They're doing great with the trails. So, we can get more of them in town, get more projects on trails and get people out of cars to help inhibit traffic. It's a good Segway into what we're working on right now.

Ryan Alford [00:17:08] We're going to go there. We're ready to talk about that. 

Nick Gilley [00:17:13] We can foreshadow. 

Ryan Alford [00:17:16] We'll foreshadow that shop. And I tell it like someone that's listening, I mean, we have a lot of variable listeners and you get shared of different things. But talk about maybe one or two tips or pitfalls on the entrepreneur side and then maybe the dark side, maybe a struggle that you had or a recommendation that you have for someone like thinking about getting into either one of those. 

Nick Gilley [00:17:48] Being an entrepreneur, what's easy about being an entrepreneur is when you have money, what's hard about being an entrepreneur is trying to get to the point where you have money to make these ideas and these concepts worthwhile. So, I definitely say that Sarah and I started with nothing. We are everything that we have. It's just been hard work, dedication and effort. And it's taken two of us definitely the marriage of two working individuals, who know how to work hard, how to please clients and to get referrals has allowed us to get to the point where we are today. So, I've always had the entrepreneurial spirit and it's just now to the point where we have the means to start to make some of these ideas come to fruition. And we're talking fifteen years of hard work. We're talking a lot of ups and downs economic cycles, times where I've been a contractor for 6/7 years. And I was now saying that my resume trying to get hired on in the other firms. So as you hear with so many people is like failure is a requirement for success. You have to honestly know what it's like to take ideas and concepts and to run with these ideas. You're going to hit pitfalls along the way. You're going to have these struggles. So the tips stay true. I know that those hard times are there, but it's work ethic. Starting your day is grinding it out. It's hustling. And that put us in the position where we are to be able to acquire other businesses, to diversify ourselves, to now have all of these ideas that I've always had on the creative side. And to have these connections of 16, 17 years of being here in Greenville to be able to pull these individuals together in a room and sit here and talk about these great ideas and let's make these things happen. And that's where we are today, is it? It's not overnight that you're talking decades of effort, decades of hard work and dedication to make things happen. 

Ryan Alford [00:20:00] So no physical fitness and health are important to you and Sarah. And why the hell a gym!? Like I get mad about Greenville Nicotera and it's a franchise from a Charlotte-based gym of Madabolic. And I've been going there for four years, even before Nick and Sarah bought the franchise, so I love it. It's the best workout in Greenville, high-intensity interval training. They don't call it that anymore. But I'm still going to call it that because for people listening, it's an easy way to understand it. Are we OK with that? If I break your brand rolls is Madabolic, we are going to fire me through you because the interval training.

But backing up. Why metabolic Greensville? I mean you guys were going right. And then what pushed you to start this venture called, Madabolic?

Nick Gilley [00:21:07] Well it was never my plan to own a gym. That was not something that was foreshadowed in, my career path. However, finance was in diversification and seeing  my family's business be so one tracked and losing everything. So diversification was inherent, something I always want to do soon as I was able to. I want to diversify. So in 2014, I had a good friend who was new, the owners, the founders of a gym, and they want ed to move to Greenville. And he asked if I wanted to put a bid on the construction of the place. So, I met him a few times and love the whole concept. So I won the job, the upset of metabolic. So how we got in is I built the gym, so it was one and done. I built in free membership for Sarah and I lowered my fee there. And so we started going prior to that. And we were at the YMCA Peak Fitness, wherever we were just the typical stuff, throw up some weights not really know what you're doing. You do a little cardio weightlifting along with a little play on your phone. And that was our workout a couple of times a week. It was the first time since soccer that I loved exercise again. It's absolutely the routine of it, the community of it, the challenging nature in general. So we fell in love with it as the years went on. This was a corporate store, so the owner, the founders of metabolic, owned the store, they had general managers and nobody locally with no local ownership as a presence, as a face of the business. It didn't take off. Nobody was here pushing metabolic walking the streets, doing everything it takes to make it business successful. And they realize: “Well, we need some local ownership here”. We're interested in selling the business. And so I was one of the first and I was the only one they approached and talked about it. We don't know if we want to throw this in. We weren't trainers at the time. We didn't have that experience. But so will buy a minority percentage for a year and see what we think and see if we can take it to where we expect. So we put in a little bit of money for a year. We started working there, took over the management of it and quickly realized this is something that we can do. We love this. Do we love this vibe? And I think one of the things I keep going back on is on a job site, it is controlled chaos. It's people scrambling around. It's hard grinding work. And, when I get called in typically my phone only rings when there are problems on jobs. Problem solveing is what I do best. 

That's my job is to fix things that are messed up. And you go into the gym and it's the whole mindset of people and endorphins. It's just happiness. It's like no matter how crazy it is out there on a job site, we can come to our gym and everybody's thrilled to see us and that's how we fell in love with that. It's intoxicating to get in there and to feed off of the energy that happens in gyms. So it was January 18 was we bought it. So, had all of last year. And this year we have had tremendous growth over the last 13 months of full ownership shoot. We're up over 60 percent in membership than we were a year and a month ago. So it is what we're doing is working. And Sarah has a huge part in that. That tag team duo is really taking us where we are today. So that's how that's what got us mad about was I needed to diversify this opportunity presented itself and we grabbed it. 

Ryan Alford [00:25:16] And what do you think of now having you in the gym? And They've been involved for roughly two years and are now full ownership a year; it's different. Jim's strike me is hard from the standpoint of especially at the end that Madabolic is that I don't call it the high end, but it's definitely a more focused tribal community thing. And the community aspect is so important and that's you can't manufacture that. And I think that's what's been great about what's happened since you guys took over. And it's the trajectory still going on. But talk a little bit about what it's taken to build that culture. 

Nick Gilley [00:26:06] Oh, so much effort and when we took this on, I was like we have a number in our gym. We maxed out at 300 members. It gets uncomfortable. People aren't getting in classes or it is full all the time. And when we took it on, we were at 100, like we know 200 people. We know we can convince 200 people to get in here, 150 people to just get in our gym, and we thought I was going to be way easier than it was. And it turns out, I think Madabolic can be intimidating to a lot of people. So, that's one of the things that we were struggling with. But getting out in the community more, trying to allow people to get into the facility so they can see that the vibe is not intimidating. What was not being done prior to us coming on was the community. Nobody was out in the streets. Nobody was out partying with Lululemon partying with Scopa, partnering with Southernism, getting to all the fitness stores in town talking to him. So what we've done differently is we're on the streets and we're pulling the community together. And, since we've started doing it there's so much more of a presence and all these other ones. So what I love about what I've seen over the past year is that I felt pretty isolated and metabolic, that we were focused only on metabolic. But since then with the partnership with Lululemon and some of the other gyms, we have this collective group of the leaders from all of these gyms are now getting together a couple of times a month and traveling to each other's studio. And, it's the community itself that has gone from being isolated to trying to make your one business successful, to saying, “hey, guys, we're all in the same arena here.” 

Ryan Alford [00:28:07] If you elevate the whole fitness game in Greenville, there are not so many of you guys that everyone won't come along for the ride. So it's like “raise the category, raise the awareness, raise the education” on the importance of health or stretching or fit our food and beverage. That's a part of the lifestyle. Like raise all of that awareness and people start looking for more of those outlets and mad about being tied to that knowledge base. You come with it. And I think that's what you're seeing. I mean, talk about the husband-wife duo. I love Sarah. You guys run the business together, but keep it real. I think about this when I see you guys at the gym and I know it's not easy, but you all have a good relationship. But working with a spouse and I know you're with basic sixty yards on the field all day, every day. But I mean, keep it up real for people listening that might be thinking about, like working with a spouse or like how do you keep the balance there. 

Nick Gilley [00:29:26] Right before it was like I guess sometimes I think it's hard as fuck this. This is so hard. The marriage of businesses and spouses. And so many people have their job and they work their job and they can leave their job and go about their day. With us, there's no hour. There are no ten minutes that's not business-related, family-related. It's a marriage of all of it in life. So it doesn't work for everybody. There's a lot of people that would say, “no, I need to be able to turn it off.” Well, when I have my own business Base-360, when we have a business together, Madabolic, when she has her own business selling real estate it every minute of every day. We're getting emails about it. We definitely have our family time. Our phones get turned off. When it's dinnertime we have to have that nature. But at the same time, you have to be able to always be turned on. I mean, it was eleven o'clock at night two nights ago. I was dead asleep and she woke me up to talk about footers in our new house we're building and was like “well, when is this happening?” “Like, it's eleven, really. You have to give me a break. But this is my only time to talk to you so it can wait.” 

Ryan Alford [00:30:43] I can't say much about that. Nicole and I struggle like and we have a two and a half-year-old and like until he's asleep and that's not till eight, eight-thirtyIt's like “where is the time to catch up on anything”?

Nick Gilley [00:31:06] And we accomplish it, on my calendar I have an hour set aside during the workday that we sit there and we talk about all the things we have, the Madabolic in the house building that we're staying. And if we all do that, we're going to go work out together sometimes. 

Staying a happily married couple is probably the hardest that it takes more effort. And what happens is you change. So the person that you're married to all those years ago is not the person you are now and she's not the person then. And so you constantly have to wind your way through life together, changing together as much as you can with that common goal.

Of course, on Facebook we're the picture perfect couple. But in real life, we struggle just like everybody else. And I don't think there's a couple that doesn't do that. But we love each other and that's enough to get us through.  

Ryan Alford [00:32:33] So what's the future hold? And I mean, the Base-360 is taken off Madabolic. All the trajectories look good. And I mean, I know you aren't resting on your laurels. I know you got some exciting different things and ideas and maybe some new developments and different things. So what's the future hold? 

Nick Gilley [00:32:51] We've got a lot of business plans right now. So, one thing we struggle with is subcontractors. Finding good subcontractors to be reliable. So I find myself performing so much more. So we really have two business plans that we're going to create, some sub-entities. Base-360 to start self-performing a lot. So, growing from our business, from inside, capturing on a lot of times I feel like the only person making money on job, a subcontractor. So why don't we be our own subcontractors? I'll make more money. 

Ryan Alford [00:33:24] So you'll get to know if that's the answer. 

Nick Gilley [00:33:26] We're going to find out pretty soon. So I have a couple of business plans that we're working on. We Base-360, but. The most exciting one that we're working on is trying to solve an issue the Greenville's had, spent a lot of time at city hall and read a lot of the articles, talk to economic development. And affordable housing is something that every city struggles with, especially cities on the growth pattern, like Greenville. So how to make affordable housing a reality and not be a piece of crap. So that was something that I started contemplating a year ago. And we're finally bringing that to fruition. So I developed a concept, The Elements brand. We're continuing to grow, but Elements Eco for e-commerce. So I see affordable housing not as a function of quality, but as a function of size. So there's so much talk about tiny homes out there and they make sense. People can live in smaller spaces. You're not going to find grandma and grandpa that want to go live in a 400 or 500 square foot home. But you're going to find a lot of millennials. You're going to find a lot of people who realize that we don't need three thousand square feet out in Simpsonville to be comfortable. I'd rather be in town with 520 square feet and be able to walk to work.

Ryan Alford: And then have money to go do vacations and experiences!

Nick Gilley [00:34:54] Right, so we're trying to talk about affordable housing. I have a concept. We're working on-site to be released later in time, but it's one of the new swamp rabbit spurs that's going through town. So that swamp rabbit trails are not built on this particular piece of property yet, but we're looking at, a hundred homes on. A very steep site; it's pretty much unbuildable to most people, but I think if we can find a way to Nestle homes into a hillside, we can cut the cost of construction by not having the side, all five sides of home; b only having to put a glass facade on one side or keep it minimalist, modern, clean. We can create some very affordable homes yet interesting, nestled very close to downtown. So Elements Eco has been my pet project for the last little bit, where it's getting legs hopefully a couple of months will have a release of this is what we're working on. But I’m trying to push the boundaries of construction instead of having to look through printouts and pages, you go into an app on your phone, you look at a site plan, you select a floor plan, put a deposit down, make a few selections in your house, purchase three or four months later, here you go, here's your new affordable eco-home! So that's the latest and greatest concept we've been working on 

Ryan Alford [00:36:20] Where does the inspiration draw, because with everything that you just described and is that just creativity for you? Is that, drawing inspiration from outside of more nationally or even globally? I mean is that just what's the world that's drawn from? 

Nick Gilley [00:36:42] Well, and it is creativity. If you trace back that concept through my mind, how it worked was the whole shipping container aspect. Almost 18 months ago, we got involved for Gather TVO. So the whole ship and then everybody's been talking about shipping container, construction for a while. So it was things we talked about before. But, having the first-hand experience with shipping containers of about 400 square feet, 324 and square feet in most containers. And, that linear dimension. And what I wanted to do was build one of these on Airbnb - I said “I need a lake house”. And what's most affordable I can do is take a shipping container, put it in the hillside and make a few Airbnb. So, this was a thought process I had a year ago. And to do that in the well, why don't we take this concept and try to tackle affordable housing with this concept and take some of these sites in town that have extremely steep Toppo, build them into the hillside virtually unusable land to most people. Why don't we solve the problem? Well, this interesting concept of construction science that's being talked about and see if it works. 

Ryan Alford [00:37:48] I love it. Any other tips, pointers or anything else you can think of? But I think it's been interesting here in your background here and your thought process here and the realities of entrepreneurship and marriage. You can follow along. We've got a series that we do for Nick with Base-360, Which is another way of looking and seeing behind the curtain for all these projects that are going on. 

Nick Gilley [00:38:43] It was like we have so many cool things going on. Ryan, let's capture some of this. Yeah, and it's not like we're trying to get land by HDTV, but what it is, is we're trying to be different. We have different projects. We want people to see it that way. And so the whole creativity aspect of it.

Ryan Alford [00:39:05] Absolutely. You can follow along #hardhatsonly on Instagram. You can follow Base-360 at Base-360.com for all the latest projects, links to #hardhatsonly social. Where else anywhere else they can find you? 

Nick Gilley [00:39:32] Madabolic Greensville. They can find me at Madabolic. You're looking for the best workout in Greenville.

Ryan Alford [00:40:41] We can make it happen. So we love it. So you can find out more about Madabolic. You've got madabolic.com and then the location. Well, Nick, man, I really appreciate you coming on the podcast. Appreciate, the ability to work on and with you on the marketing side and I’m excited about where all this growth going 

Nick Gilley [00:41:17] A shout out to Radical who hustle every day. For so they've done a killer job on both Base-360 and Madabolic, so much of our growth, I can give to Ryan and his team for putting this out there. Well, thank you.

Ryan Alford [00:41:33] No, we take a lot of pride in that. We aren't always perfect, but I think that's where it aligns. Well, Nick's a super creative guy. Nick and Sarah have a lot of ideas. I think we're a creative agency. And then we bust our ass and we care. And so it's been a good marriage and we're going to take it to the top. But thanks again, Nick. Thank you. All right, man. 

That's all for today on the radical company podcast. Follow us at radical. company. Learn more about everything going on with us. We gave you all the channels with Nick, follow him on Instagram, follow Madabolic Greensville, follow Base-360 and #HardHatsOnly and we'll see you next hour. Take care.