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Weekly Marketing and Advertising News: Domino's NOID Returns, The Big 3 Get Bigger, Ultrafabrics Color Lab Virtual Events, Nerf & TikTok

April 30, 2021

Weekly Marketing and Advertising News: Domino's NOID Returns, The Big 3 Get Bigger, Ultrafabrics Color Lab Virtual Events, Nerf & TikTok
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Welcome to this week’s marketing and advertising news on The Radcast! In this episode on The Radcast, host Ryan Alford and guest co-host Josh Hill, discuss the impact of nostalgia marketing, the growth of digital ad spending, and how brands like Nerf are taking TikTok very seriously.


In this episode on The Radcast, host Ryan Alford and guest co-host Josh Hill, discuss the impact of nostalgia marketing, the growth of digital ad spending, and how brands like Nerf are taking TikTok very seriously.

These are today’s topics:

  1. Domino's brings back the  NOID
  2. Google, Facebook, and Amazon see huge increases in ad spending year over year
  3. Ultrafabrics Color Lab launching virtual series
  4. NERF names Chief Tik Tok Officer

If you enjoyed this episode of The Radcast, leave us a review on Apple Podcasts. Subscribe and share the word if you love our podcast, so we can keep giving you the strategies to achieve radical marketing results! You can follow us on Instagram @the.rad.cast | @radical_results | @ryanalford |

Transcript

You're listening to the latest Radcast news update. Here's Ryan and Josh. 

Ryan Alford [00:00:10] Hey, guys, what's up? It's Ryan Alford. Welcome to the latest edition of the Radcast. It's the marketing and news episode here on Friday, April 30th, 2021. Where the hell did April go? Josh, what's up, brother? 

Josh Hill [00:00:27] How's it going? 

Ryan Alford [00:00:27]  Good to have Josh Hill, our Director of Digital Media, Digital Media Guru, Digital just junky, yeah, kind of adult, your digital junkie, aren't you? 

Josh Hill [00:00:38] Yeah, that's pretty accurate. 

Ryan Alford [00:00:40]  He is our Digital Marketing Manager, Digital Media Manager, and all-around all things Digital Media. And he's joined me on Media Ad Gabs. Riley is out today on a Friday. So it's you and me, brother. 

Josh Hill [00:00:54] Yes. My first news episode. 

Ryan Alford [00:00:57] Hey, it's got to get it out there. 

Josh Hill [00:00:59] Yeah. Talking about new news. 

Ryan Alford [00:01:02] Yeah. It's been a good week. We wrapped up a lot of build-ups,  to get ready for events. We had GVL Hustle last night, which is a local networking community culture event. It was very successful with roughly 100 people, 80 to 100. I didn't get an exact headcount, but a very nice turnout. And Noah Simms, who pulled out of the agency he just left, was here cooking. Did you get some corn? Oh, yes. What was the technical name? Alote. So I hadn't heard that before. Have you heard of it? Yeah, I've heard of on-the-street food. 

Josh Hill [00:01:39] OK, it's so good. 

Ryan Alford [00:01:41]  Smoked corn mixed with cheeses and it's kind of like street corn mayonnaise and cheese, jalapeños and lime. And if I'm making you hungry then eat your heart out, baby. 

Josh Hill [00:01:55] Yeah. I was not ready for corn to taste that good. 

Ryan Alford [00:01:58] I think maybe it's the best corn ever had. Yeah, but he was on a trip talking, entertaining, telling everybody about food and palate and everything else, and had a lot of great networking and good Q&A at the end. It was a very successful local event. We like to do those things to give back to the community. It raised a lot of money, several thousand dollars, I do believe, for projects hosted here locally. And they feed the hungry in Greenville, among many other things, and do a lot of great things and we were proud to sponsor them and get through all of those festivities on a foggy Friday. I had a few adult beverages last night,  so not a shame to say. 

Josh Hill3 [00:02:42] Maker's Mark came out. The local brewery. We didn't want to make them feel bad. 

Ryan Alford [00:02:47] I  didn’t want them to think I didn't like it. So, six IPAs later on, maybe seven. I don't know. Oh, he's counting here. 

Josh Hill [00:02:56] I mean, you got to make sure the Maker stays. 

Ryan Alford [00:02:57] I did avoid the Makers. I like bourbon, but I avoided the Maker's table. I'm like, it's not Friday night. It's Thursday night. And I stayed away from the bourbon table. 

Josh Hill [00:03:07] I got my days mixed up then. 

Ryan Alford [00:03:10]  You weren't sure what line it was.  Well, OK, twist my arm. I did go home with some socks that I'm not sure are going to fit me. They had a lot of sponsors. Maker's Mark was one of the sponsors for the event and they brought in some goodies at the tastings and then they had socks with Maker's Mark. Did you get some socks? 

Josh Hill [00:03:29] I didn't, but they looked great. 

Ryan Alford [00:03:30]  I got up this morning and I'm like I did remember these socks and sure enough, they were there. So a good night all around. It's been a good week here at Radical. We've been busy, we had a lot of new business calls this week and a lot of exciting stuff happening. A lot of growth, a lot of new hires, and we're interviewing people every other day. 

Josh Hill [00:03:57] Yeah, for real. 

Ryan Alford [00:03:57]  But let me ask you this Josh before we get to the news.  I know you've been digging into some Tik Tok stuff, and I know we talked a little pre-episode. Is that your number one platform on social media?  I would say it's rising on my list, Instagram's always there more because I get more on it. I get a lot of DMs communication there. So it pulls me, there's just the push-pull of where I'm posting the most content, where most people interact with me. And the interest level for Tik Tok is there. What's one of the most interesting things you've seen this week? 

Josh Hill  [00:04:40] Oh man. I mean I am always a fan of the new trends happening and stuff, but I'm noticing a lot of high strangeness coming from big brands where you'll never see it anywhere else. You won't see it on Instagram or Facebook or anything. But like one of my favorites was from Kraft Mac and Cheese. It had just a CGI skeleton running with text over it, talking about people not putting water in their mac and cheese before they microwave it, and that caused more accidents. And they have this calming music behind it. 

Ryan Alford [00:05:19]  If you can imagine a skeleton running on a screen with that music. 

Josh hill [00:05:26] But it was insane. And then I saw the light blue checkmark and saw this from Kraft itself. I like it when big corporations can take their shoes off and just have some fun. 

Ryan Alford [00:05:41] We're getting to this point where brands, the ones that are doing it well, are letting their hair back, and it used to be polished 30-second commercials at all times. And this is it. But, craft blowing everybody up with us in nudes. Yeah, I love that campaign. They have to cancel the culture. One day they bowed under pressure and removed it, but it was awesome. And then now everybody is kind of the democratization of the content. Like it doesn't have to be beautiful, just has to be entertaining or weird or like I don't know, it's gotten so random. Yeah, Tik Tok is just random in general. 

Josh Hill [00:06:21] Oh yeah. It's a little melter brain but it's great and I love it. I just remember growing up with craft commercials and mom making lunch and it is super wholesome and fun, like a happy family and stuff. And then, now it's CGI skeletons walking around and in nudes. I'm like this is way more fun, way more memorable. 

Ryan Alford [00:06:42] But what do you think, how is the discovery on Tik Tok? I've been on the platform for a year and getting more and more into it with my usage, my time on, it's just, the feed, like scrolling through it the algorithm has my golf tips here, but the random videos here, funny guy, they're like, you know, intermixed with a lot of randomnesses, but I have it. Do you use the search? Are there certain things? Are you discovering it still feels kind of like natural discovery or are you, searching more and looking up? 

Josh Hill [00:07:22] Usually it's on the for you page to show me random stuff. And then I kind of got left in with my friends who will send me their funny Tik Toks that they found and think is funny. And the search function is crazy because I can search for something that was in the video and it wasn't in the caption or like the hashtags or anything. And I can still find it, which is useful for going back out, sometimes I'll remember something like with my friends like you have to see this one. 

Ryan Alford [00:07:51] I  have been using it more and I'm getting more. But I haven't established how you have the habits, you have the social media, the keystrokes, and the weird things what to do and you learn that every time and I certainly have a few for Tik Tok, but I don't have like every one of them, as I have on Instagram or LinkedIn or Facebook or whatever. It's mastering like how I'm saving this or how I'm interacting with that or how I'm remembering this. I'm still kind of getting there. I need a Tik Tok for dummies. 

Josh Hill [00:08:28] Tik Tok for how to Tik Tok. 

Ryan Alford [00:08:29] How to Tik Tok. Well, let's get to some news. So first on today's topics, I think you found this and  I don't think I remember this. And I'm like, this is before your time buddy. And look, it's almost before my time. I think this was first introduced in the 80s when I was some staunch college kid or when  I was like six, Domino's pizza and the Noyd. So it was a campaign in the 80s, maybe even early 90s, to avoid the Noyd. It was kind of that antihero, definitely a mascot-driven old campaign. I do remember it was always the Noyd was trying to get in the way of a proper pizza being delivered in some way, whether it was hijacking the driver or the cook or something. It was the kind of anti-hero getting in the way. I think it was trying to depict maybe what the other experience or maybe a rival pizza person was trying to do. So they didn't do what they were supposed to do. 

Josh Hill [00:09:44] Yeah, they always had thirty minutes or less and delivered it hot. Yeah. No one had the ice gun to make the triangle, 

Ryan Alford [00:09:51]  But now they have brought it back. So what are some of the details that we found with how they're bringing the campaign back? 

Josh Hill [00:10:00] Yeah. So they're going for this like they're going for the future. And the past year they've got the nostalgia from the Noyd, but they're using it as a way to promote their kind of beta testing, like doing autonomous delivery with these like robot cars in Houston right now. They started this week. And so people like select customers in Houston can get Domino's Pizza delivered by a robot car. And the Noyd is going to try to stop your robot car. 

Ryan Alford [00:10:31] Do you hear that? You're that the future. It's coming. It's here. The future is here. It's no longer out there that we have driverless cars and they're delivering Pizza Hut to our door. That's like,  we've been talking about this forever and I don't know why it scares the shit out of me thinking about driverless cars. I know that there are some idiots on the road, but something about the robot driving the cars, like getting two Terminators for me or so. 

Josh Hill [00:10:56] Yeah, yeah. But I mean, they sneaked it in. What if we just deliver pizzas with it, then it'll be fine. 

Ryan Alford [00:11:02] Exactly. Then, the robot is going to be so smart, it is going to tell us, we shouldn't be eating pizza it is bad for us. Or maybe they want to feed us pizza so that way they can take over the world. Yeah. I don't know. 

Josh Hill [00:11:15] The pizzas are going to start like putting like pineapple on it for people who like it. 

Ryan Alford [00:11:20] Oh yeah, exactly. Oh, pineapple pizza. Some people love that shit. No, I hate it. 

Josh hill [00:11:26] Oh I'll take it. 

Ryan Alford [00:11:27] You like pineapple pizza?. With what other toppings though? 

Josh Hill [00:11:31] Oh man. Like ham, bacon, chicken, and pepperoni is good with pineapple. 

Ryan Alford  [00:11:38] I'm getting there, and Noah is opening my eyes to the sweet and the salty and all that coming together. But  I don't know that I like pineapple sweetness with cheese pizzas. 

Josh Hill [00:11:52] You'll get there one day. 

Ryan Alford [00:11:54] Yeah. Let us know in the DMs and the comments. What do you think of pineapple pizza?. Yay or nay?. We need to do a poll. We will release some of these highlights. 

Josh Hill [00:12:03] Would you rather have pineapple on your pizza or pizza on your pineapple? 

Ryan Alford[00:12:06] Yeah,  When I think of pineapples I think of a drink by the pool, like having a pineapple smoothie or like a pina colada. And that's something in that. Yeah, it's sunny like 85 here, and I'm by the pool having a pina colada right now and a nice nap on a foggy Friday. But I like bringing about nostalgia. A lot of campaigns are doing that. We've seen the branding, with McDonald's and some of their packaging nostalgia, the Burger King, and their logo. So you're seeing a lot of this nostalgia marketing come back in different ways. But I think we could stand for a few more mascots in the pizza wars and I'd like to see the Noyd and the little Caesar guy get out and battle. 

Josh hill [00:12:56] Yeah, that'd be great. 

Ryan Alford [00:12:58] What is his name? Is it  Little Caesar?.  Is that his name? 

Josh Hill [00:13:02] I guess so. 

Ran Alford [00:13:03] Little Caesar's Pizza, but they don't identify him. Well, here's Little Caesar. This is the name of the pizza, am I right? Don't ever go home, he has never really had a speaking part. I didn't bring that back. Pizza. Pizza. Caveman. So next on the news list; This is kind of a universal trend that we talk about a lot. But it's also newsworthy because Google, Facebook, and Amazon, the big three get bigger. Ad sales are going through the roof, especially digital media ad sales specifically for these guys. So Google reported 32 percent increases in ad sales. Facebook was 46 percent. Amazon a whopping year over year, an increase of 77 percent in ad sales. First impressions from all of that. 

Josh Hill [00:14:05] Do you know that the number those numbers increased from was not small. 

Ryan Alford [00:14:09]  Yes, we're talking billions. Yeah. 

Josh Hill [00:14:11] Yes. It's kind of shocking at first, but then it made sense. And I think a key thing to remember is they increased massively,  and some people might be like, oh well it's not going to increase that much next year or it's going to go down next year. I highly doubt that, I don't think this is going to stop anytime soon. It's just going to keep going.

 Ryan Alford [00:14:39]  If you're in the industry you will recognize the increase. Amazon increased their sales revenue overall another whopping some billion number. I don't have the exact number for the sales as much as the percentage on the ads. But people don't recognize the number of ad dollars that Amazon gets. It's like the everyday person thinks they're selling a lot of products and Amazon is making a lot of money, selling a lot of those products. And the people selling those products make it. But the ad infrastructure that's behind all of the recommended products, the top of the search funnel, like when you search for summer and discovery, it's no different. 

Josh Hill [00:15:21]  Amazon  is not putting that there because they want you to buy, someone's paying them to put that there 

Ryan Alford [00:15:29] Exactly, sponsored content. Folks, when you see that sponsored above it, they paid for it to be there and it doesn't necessarily mean it is the best tank top you need with that other tank top. If you're buying, it just means someone's bought the ad space to be put in front of you while you're shopping for other things like this. So I do think that for the most part, Amazon hides its ads well. 

Josh Hill [00:15:53] Well, yeah, they make it very look very native. 

Ryan Alford [00:15:57]  I think they do a really good job of hiding their ads.  I think that's why people are probably hearing this and if you're not in everyday media ad buying or something like that, you may or may not be surprised. But, I do think people certainly understand that sponsored means something. But even my eye sometimes does not catch this monster term and I'm thinking it's a recommendation based on preference. There is some other algorithm that's smart, that's related to what I would want or the quality of it when it's a paid ad. 

Josh Hill [00:16:32] Yeah. Especially when you do the sort by,  top reviews, and then you see the sponsor one above, and it's got like two reviews. It's like, yeah, that one's the best one. 

Ryan Alford [00:16:41]  I'm buying this pair of shorts and suddenly there's this floral print shirt and I'm like,  I don't wear floral shirts. In my Hawaiian shirt, we had the CMO of Shyness on our last podcast talking about an event party wear. Oh, yes. It was quite intriguing and we haven't even released it yet, but that's coming out, and it's hilarious. So are you a big event party goer?  Are you a themed party guy?. 

Josh Hill [00:17:16] Yeah.  I like themed parties. I need to expand my wardrobe for that. 

Ryan Alford [00:17:22]  You need to go check Shyesty out. But yeah that was a good talk. The big are getting bigger. I mean they joke, we read about it, you see it being in the industry, the big three and they are just increasing. And I think you're seeing Facebook bounce back a little bit from; still a little in warm water, I'd call it,  with all the privacy stuff they've been going through. But the reality is, and we've seen it a little bit with our spending, that the ad dollar, the pricing is creeping up Cost per impression and things like that. We see those metrics change from time to time. You start seeing them bumping up and more demand than supply at times. 

Josh Hill [00:18:08] Yeah.  A lot of people are getting on the Internet for the first time and a key thing to remember is not all of America is online, not all the world is online and that's growing all the time. And then a lot of people who are on the Internet aren't comfortable buying from the Internet still, but it's growing rapidly. A lot of people have made their first online purchases in the past year, and it's proving that it's working with all this advertising and stuff. So we've got new advertisers competing for that with new customers online. And again, it's just going to keep growing. It's super, highly effective, 

Ryan Alford [00:18:46] It's a good time to own a digital agency or to work with one. So we're in a good spot. I think we all have a little bit of job security for a little while until Google, Facebook, and Amazon take over all of us and who knows? 

Josh Hill [00:18:59] But they'll just tell us what to buy. 

Ryan Alford [00:19:01] Exactly. They need us to help sell their ads anyway. 

Josh Hill [00:19:05] Yeah. 

Ryan Alford [00:19:05] We can't sell to everyone.  OK, next on the list. We have a client, a really great client; ‘ultra fabrics’. They are one of the leading providers of performance leather and fabrics. I'll call that, I would say an improved leather sustainable product. It is in the new McLaren. Let's call a spade a spade if it's good enough in the McLaren. We're talking about some quality stuff here. And they've been a great client. We're helping them with some stuff. But they had an interesting digital expose, if I may call it. They've got a virtual event, a couple of virtual events, a panel, the thing all around their color lab. So they do all of these fabrics and they're well known for the layers of colors and the modern colors that they have. They have a colorist on staff. They do some amazing things, but they've got this conscious use of color conference kind of happening and talking about the power of color and, being in marketing and branding, it's kind of a dual path. Yes, they're a client but I thought this was interesting what they're doing and bringing these people together and having this discussion. But as we think about when you think about us and you think about brands and marketing and all that and the power of it, like the power of red, the strength of red. Every bank is blue. How many banks are blue?  Bank of America, USAA, like almost every bank has blue in it when you think about it. And it's like the use of color and branding and marketing for us is very obvious and as I look at you with your yellow shirt on. Yes. If you're watching the video, you'll know what I'm saying. And if you don't, Josh has a bright yellow t-shirt on. I forget the brand. What brand is that? The trans. The trans. That's right. That's a local brand. Oh, yeah. Yes. Support local. I love it. But I mean, what are your thoughts about the use of color in general? And what are they doing here with the color lab? 

Josh Hill [00:21:02] Yeah, I think it's cool. Color is way more important than you might initially think. And just looking over their promo for it and they're getting into the historical and cultural significance of different shades of color. And then there's always the psychological impact of it. I remember a big trend, all restaurants have to have red interiors because that makes you more hungry. Yeah. Or can't be green inside or whatever, but it's super impactful. It creates a context that you might not even think about now. 

Ryan Alford [00:21:37] It does. And you don't realize the impact of color. We work with a lot of fabric companies and it is so intrinsic. I am sitting in this chair right now and you don’t realize that some sort of fabric, and not only what you are wearing, is in use within inches of you at every moment, every room you walk in, every seat you sit on, every wall now with wall coverings and everything else, the floors with fabric from carpets and things like that. But then you layer on the color impact of those things. As we sit in our studio we've got the impact of color behind us. All I see is your shirt in this small room and the impact that color has on it. I do remember working on a firehouse as a sub and their red house, red engine, red alert, alert. Yeah. Time to heat the firehouse. But the psychology of color in decision making. And, we've had neuro guys on several times, and I would love to even talk that up with them. The impact of color on the brain, how the brain reacts to color because I know it does. It's just proven. So it's really interesting that they're doing this. We support them. Great client. You need to check and learn about all this. I'm not going to get into every detail, but middle to late may go to Ultra Fabrics Inc.com  go to learn all about the conscious use of color and the power of color through their conscious series that they're having. So check that out. Very interesting. Finally, and I like this. Oh yeah. Nerf, let's talk some Nerf. 

Josh Hill [00:23:35] Oh yeah. Nerf opened up a new C-level position. They were advertising this new position all of last month. They're offering it for three months, and it's going to be thirty thousand dollars for three months. Small contract, but you could be the very first chief Tik Tok officer, CTTO of Nerf. Yes, it's Nerf or it's nothing. Tons of people are making Tik Toks and I saw all over my feed people auditioning to be the new Tik Tok officer. They made their hire last week, and this is probably the most fitting hire that I could think of. Sophie Jamison, a.k.a. Nerfers 101,  on Tik Tok.  She's 20 years old, has one point eight million followers on Tik Tok. Just all she does is post about NERF. She'll post about Nerf stereotypes and classic Nerf jokes, Nerf news. And she had some about the new Nerf and Supreme collab. She is now nurse chief Tik Tok officer. 

Ryan Alford [00:24:53] There's a lot to unpack there. I'm going to start down some nostalgia of my own when I think of Nerf. I remember I don't know if I was five or seven and I also don't know what it was. But when you get your first Nerf football, that foam football and I would throw this baby. Don't let it get wet though. I think it's ten thousand pounds when it's wet. I loved to play football over at my house and I thought NERF was the greatest thing ever because it's light and you are a kid. A full-size football when you're seven years old is daunting, to throw or hold. So  Nerf football came out, I'm like, oh yeah,  I cant wait to get my hands on that thing. And,  it didn't hurt when you catch it or if it hit you in the face. It hurts if a regular football hits you in the face,  but if you get hit with the Nerf you could bounce back pretty quick from that thing. 

Josh Hill [00:25:46] Oh yeah. No one's running home crying for that one though. 

Ryan Alford [00:25:49] But then the Nerf guns come out and you shoot bullets. My kids are shooting these Nerf balls. I step on one like every other morning.  I'm like tripping over Nerf bullets, just trying to get a bowl of cereal in the morning. 

Josh Hill [00:26:01] Yeah. My older brother and I have full-on Nerf battles, and my younger brother started getting Nerf guns, but my parents decided to get him the fully automatic ones. They've got missile launchers and stuff. 

Ryan Alford [00:26:11] Oh yeah. A little bit biased there. He got these things on the side that shoot the big Nerf things and Nash is shooting me with the gun and like they got these missiles launchers on the side, and he is asking me if I like them and I’m like dang, I hurt. Y I did wonder about the little rubber ends though, about them hitting you in the eyes. But they are square so it may be ok. 

Josh Hill [00:26:38] I mean Nerf is very culturally significant at this point and then very significant to our office. I think we quote the SNL skit there, Scrounge back probably once a week at least. 

Ryan Alford [00:26:50]  Scrounge back is one of the  greatest SNL skits of all time, Crossfade, Scroung Back, Nerf Scrounge bat 

Josh Hill [00:26:57]    It is way better than regular Scrounge back 

Ryan Alford [00:26:59]  It is better than regular Scrounge back. But oh, speaking of that, I do remember as a kid I got the Nerf ball bat and the dog he chews that shit up,  oh, God, it goes everywhere. It's like pieces everywhere.  The dog that would always chew like one or two things. The NERF balls were either waterlogged or the dog chewed it up and so they had a life span of two weeks max. And occasionally mom would go to the discount store and get the non-Nerf football but it's not the same. I don't know what that Nerf shit is, but it is way better than the discount balls. It didn't have the same kind of heft when you throw it and you can't throw a spiral with it. It's like wobbling around. Mom's like it's the same thing. I'm like, Mom, it's not the same thing. My friends are going to laugh at me. This whole Nerf bullshit you brought home. 

Josh Hill [00:27:53] Yeah, they nailed it. It's Nerf or it's nothing. 

Ryan Alford [00:27:56] It is Nerf or nothing. But let's get back to the core of the marketing side of things and put nostalgia on the back burner. Look Chief Tik Tok Officer. Look, if you're paying attention now, I mean you've got Nerf doing Tik Tok, and look, it's right in their freaking demo so they should be doing this. But the fact that they had the balls to pull this off and it's awesome.  I mean, what an experience for it. You've got Nerf 101 like you're reaching out to influencers, but you're doing it in an impactful way because you're bringing them in, letting them work with your CMO, or whoever I think was the CMO wasn't one of them. 

Josh Hill [00:28:33] The executive, the global marketing officer, or whatever it is of Tik Tok is personally mentoring her, what an experience. 

Ryan Alford [00:28:45] Yeah. She’s already producing all the content and is well on her way to being a marketing wizard early. To be a youngster and get this kind of experience. Good grief, the sky's the limit. 

Josh Hill [00:28:59] I think it's a trend we've been seeing, but they're doing it well and they're kind of headlining this getting your customer base, the people, your super fans, because Sofia, I would say, is a super fan of Nerf, bring them in. Let them make your content, UGC, and pay them. But that's awesome and that's someone who's taking it easy and letting the reins loose a little bit and bringing people into the team. 

Ryan Alford [00:29:31] I wonder if they'll let her stick around or if they'll do some kind of engagement longer than the three months that they planned? I know the ad platform is coming along better. So it will be interesting to see. Right now it's been mainly probably planned play, you know, high funnel brand play for a lot of these companies. Be interesting how they start to monetize it if they're seeing impact or if they're able to correlate it. It makes sense intrinsically from a brand perspective, you're raising awareness, you're at the demo that's buying the products that you want them to have that relationship with. So, yeah, I see the band play. I just wonder if and how you start to see that that switch is going to be products within Tik Tok like you see on Instagram and we're getting closer to that aren't we? 

Josh Hill [00:30:23] I know they've tested it in a couple of countries on the products. 

Ryan Alford [00:30:30] But they need to get the Scrounge back up. 

Josh Hill [00:30:33] They need to do that. I think that's priority number one here. Let's everyone reach out to if this 

Ryan Alford [00:30:38] Let's do a whole new segment on just how we get in building the scrounge. In twenty-eight minutes to talk about so that we can get to how we can talk more about scrounge back'. 

Josh Hill [00:30:50] It's why we do what we do here. 

Ryan Alford [00:30:53] It is all the fluff just to get to the sizzle of  Scrudge back. Now go do yourself a favor. Go, go YouTube SNL Scrudge. You'll thank me for it later. 

Josh Hill [00:31:04] Yeah. That's your homework for the night. 

Ryan Alford [00:31:06] Quite funny. Well, Josh, I appreciate you as always, stepping in, and always good to talk marketing and news with you. 

Josh Hill [00:31:15]  It’s always good to be here. 

Ryan Alford [00:31:16] All right, guys, you know where to find us. The Radcast.com, all of our content, all of our highlights, audio, video. And you never know what other Easter eggs you might find there. And we're at the.Rad.cast Instagram. You'll find me at Ryan Alford on Instagram. Ryan. Alford on Tik Tok where I am getting more active and I look forward to seeing you there. We'll see you next time on the Radcast.